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  Asymptotic oscillations in the tracking behaviour of the fly Musca domestica

Geiger, G., & Poggio, T. (1981). Asymptotic oscillations in the tracking behaviour of the fly Musca domestica. Biological Cybernetics, 41(3), 197-201. doi:10.1007/BF00340320.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-6C2F-E Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-6C30-B
Genre: Journal Article

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Geiger, G, Author
Poggio, T1, 2, Author              
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1Former Department Information Processing in Insects, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497801              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: From recent theoretical work (Poggio and Reichardt, 1981), high frequency oscillations are expected in the angular trajectory of houseflies tracking a moving target if the target's retinal position controls the flight torque by means of a stronger optomotor response to progressive than to regressive motion. Experiments designed to test this conjecture have shown that (a) asymptotic non-decaying oscillations are found in the torque of female houseflies tracking targets moving at constant angular velocity; (b) the magnitude of the oscillations grows monotonically with mean retinal excentricity of the target; (c) the period of the oscillation is around 180–200 ms. The experimental findings are consistent with the hypothesis that a “progressive-regressive mechanism” plays a significant role in the tracking behaviour of female houseflies. From this phenomenological point of view a flicker mechanism that is active only for nonzero motion is equivalent to a progressive-regressive system. The relatively long period of the oscillation requires more complex reaction dynamics than a pure single dead-time delay. As a specific example we show that a model where the reaction to progressive motion is “sticky”, holding for a longish time after the ending of the stimulus, is consistent with the experimental data.

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 Dates: 1981-09
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/BF00340320
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Title: Biological Cybernetics
  Other : Biol. Cybern.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Berlin : Springer
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 41 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 197 - 201 Identifier: ISSN: 0340-1200
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954927549307