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  Natural history of the Australian digger wasp Sphex cognatus Smith (Hymenoptera, Sphecidae)

Ribi, W., & Ribi, L. (1980). Natural history of the Australian digger wasp Sphex cognatus Smith (Hymenoptera, Sphecidae). Journal of Natural History, 13(6), 693-701. doi:10.1080/00222937900770521.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-6F67-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-6F68-A
Genre: Journal Article

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Ribi, WA1, 2, Author              
Ribi, L, Author
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1Former Department Comparative Neurobiology, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497800              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: sphex cognatus Smith (Smith 1856, Bohart and Menke 1976) is a gregarious ground nester. It lives in colonies of up to several hundred females. The burrow, made by the female, is 25–35 cm deep with three or four cells radiating from the main burrow. Digging always occurs before the female leaves the hole for hunting; each time she leaves, she closes the nest entrance. Four or five bush-crickets of the genus Conocephalus, (Orthoptera, Tettigoniidae) are brought in as prey to fill one cell. In each cell one egg is laid against one of the bush-cricket's coxae. The male, slightly larger than the female, defends his territory against incursions by other males and watches out for females. Males seek to mate with females carrying prey. The strikingly green bush-cricket underneath the female may serve as a recognition signal. Mating takes place on the ground for 25–40s, during which the female continues to hold her prey. In flight the mandibles of the female grasp the prey by its antennae while the three pairs of legs provide additional support for the body of the prey. As soon as she lands, however, she grasps the bush-cricket by the antennae with her mandibles only. Male and female wasps feed on nectar of local plants.

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 Dates: 1980-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1080/00222937900770521
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Title: Journal of Natural History
  Other : J. Nat. Hist.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Taylor & Francis
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 13 (6) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 693 - 701 Identifier: ISSN: 0022-2933
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/110985822455030