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  Close management of sheep in ancient Central Asia: evidence for foddering, transhumance, and extended lambing seasons during the Bronze and Iron Ages

Ventresca Miller, A. R., Haruda, A., Varfolomeev, V., Goryachev, A., & Makarewicz, C. A. (2020). Close management of sheep in ancient Central Asia: evidence for foddering, transhumance, and extended lambing seasons during the Bronze and Iron Ages. Science and Technology of Archaeological Research: STAR, 1759316. doi:10.1080/20548923.2020.1759316.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-7252-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-7253-C
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Ventresca Miller, Alicia R.1, Author              
Haruda, A., Author
Varfolomeev, V., Author
Goryachev, A., Author
Makarewicz, C. A., Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Kazakhstan, pastoralism, livestock, fodder, transhumance, millet
 Abstract: Pastoralism in Central Asia directed the utilization of natural resources, yet information on livestock management strategies remain scarce. Carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) isotope analyses of domesticated sheep teeth are used to identify animal management strategies. Sheep from Kent exhibit an inverserelationship where low δ18O values coincide with high δ13C values, consistent with the foddering of caprines in the winter for this location which occursalongside evidence for an extended lambing season. At the high altitude encampment of Turgen, Bronze Age sheep exhibit low δ18O values that coincide withhigh δ13C values, suggesting that livestock were moved to low altitude pastures in the winter months. Iron Age sheep sequences also have an inverserelationship, where low δ18O values coincide with high δ13C values, yet high δ13C values in the winter suggest that livestock were foddered. Our findingsindicate variation in livestock management strategies with distinct adaptations to local ecologies.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-05-12
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 21
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1080/20548923.2020.1759316
Other: shh2608
 Degree: -

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Title: Science and Technology of Archaeological Research : STAR
  Other : STAR: Science and Technology of Archaeological Research
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Abingdon : Taylor & Francis
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 1759316 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2054-8923
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2054-8923