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  First records of modified snake bones in the Pre-Columbian archaeological record of the Lesser Antilles: cultural and paleoecological implications

Bochaton, C. (2020). First records of modified snake bones in the Pre-Columbian archaeological record of the Lesser Antilles: cultural and paleoecological implications. Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology, 1749195. doi:10.1080/15564894.2020.1749195.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-7267-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-726E-F
Genre: Journal Article

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shh2609.pdf (Publisher version), 3MB
 
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 Creators:
Bochaton, Corentin1, Author              
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1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Modified bone, Martinique, squamate, zooarchaeology, Guadeloupe
 Abstract: The past distribution of Boa snakes and their interactions with Pre-Columbian human populations in the Lesser Antilles (Caribbean) remain enigmatic. These snakes currently have a patchy distribution in the islands and are nearly absent from archaeological deposits. This raises questions about whether their absence from Pre-Columbian contexts should be interpreted from a biological or a cultural point of view. In this study, I provide three new references to Boa remains from archaeological and natural deposits on the islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique, most of which were manufactured into beads. These are the first objects in the Lesser Antilles known to be manufactured using snake bones and all appear to be made from Boa, despite a wider diversity of snakes occurring in this region. Using these new observations and combined pieces of evidence from archaeological, historical, and biological data sources, I propose that the extreme scarcity of Boa in zooarchaeological assemblages reflects their prominent status in Pre-Columbian Amerindian communities.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-05-13
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 17
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1080/15564894.2020.1749195
Other: shh2609
 Degree: -

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Title: Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology
  Other : Journal of island & coastal archaeology
  Other : The Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology
  Abbreviation : JICA
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, Philadelphia : Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 1749195 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1556-4894
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1556-4894