English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  A multi-isotope, multi-tissue study of colonial origins and diet in New Zealand

King, C. L., Buckley, H. R., Petchey, P., Kinaston, R., Millard, A., Zech, J., et al. (2020). A multi-isotope, multi-tissue study of colonial origins and diet in New Zealand. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 172(4): e24077, pp. 605-620. doi:10.1002/ajpa.24077.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-73C6-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-6A8C-5
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
shh2612.pdf (Publisher version), 4MB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
shh2612.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Private
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
King, Charlotte L., Author
Buckley, Hallie R., Author
Petchey, Peter, Author
Kinaston, Rebecca, Author
Millard, Andrew, Author
Zech, Jana1, Author              
Roberts, Patrick1, Author              
Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth, Author
Nowell, Geoff, Author
Gröcke, Darren R., Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Australasia, bioarchaeology, colonial archaeology, incremental dentine isotope analysis
 Abstract: Abstract Objectives Colonial period New Zealand was lauded as a land of plenty, where colonists could improve their station in life and secure a future for their families. Our understanding of colonial experience, however, is often shaped by historical records which communicate a state-sponsored version of history. This study aims to reconstruct the lives of settlers using isotopic evidence from the colonial skeletons themselves. Materials and methods We use skeletal remains from recently excavated colonial sites in Otago (South Island, New Zealand) to illustrate the information that can be gleaned from the isotopic analysis of individuals. We use 87Sr/86Sr to identify European settlers, and δ13C and δ15N from collagen and hair keratin, as well as dental enamel carbonate δ13C to trace dietary change over their life-courses. Results Strontium isotope analysis shows that all adults in our sample are non-local. Dietary isotopes show that while most individuals had relatively consistent childhood diet, one individual with more rural origins likely had seasonal use of resources during childhood. While some members of the population seem to have increased their meat intake in the new colony most do not have clear evidence for this. Discussion We show the diversity of human experience in first-generation New Zealanders both prior to emigration and in the new colony. Despite colonial propaganda claiming that circumstances in New Zealand were improved for all settlers, we have little evidence for this, aside from among individuals of potentially high status.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-05-182020-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 16
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: 1 Introduction
2 Archaeological context
2.1 Background—Reconstructing colonial life histories using isotopic evidence
2.2 Childhood diet
2.3 Dietary change once in the colony
2.4 Examining episodes of stress isotopically
3 Methods and materials
3.1 Tooth samples
3.2 Bone samples
3.3 Hair samples
3.4 Foodweb data
3.5 Strontium isotope analysis
3.6 Bioapatite isotope analysis
3.7 Collagen extraction
3.8 Hair analysis
4 Results
4.1 Assessing adult origins using 87Sr/86Sr
4.2 Assessing childhood diet using dentinal collagen and dental enamel apatite
4.3 Changes to diet through life using δ13C and δ15N values in tooth, bone, and hair of adults
5 Discussion
5.1 Colonial origins
5.2 Childhood diet prior to emigration
5.3 Breastfeeding and weaning practices
5.4 Changes to diet through childhood
5.5 Changes to diet with emigration?
5.6 Evidence for physiological stress
5.7 The benefits of combining isotopic results with the historical record
6 Conclusion

 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/ajpa.24077
Other: shh2612
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: American Journal of Physical Anthropology
  Abbreviation : Am J Phys Anthropol
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: New York, NY : Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 172 (4) Sequence Number: e24077 Start / End Page: 605 - 620 Identifier: ISSN: 0002-9483
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954926960915