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  Neural bases of social feedback processing and self-other distinction in late childhood: The role of attachment and age

Miller, J. G., Shrestha, S., Reiss, A. L., & Vrticka, P. (2020). Neural bases of social feedback processing and self-other distinction in late childhood: The role of attachment and age. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, 20(3), 503-520. doi:10.3758/s13415-020-00781-w.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-9358-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-9359-0
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Miller, Jonas G.1, Author
Shrestha, Sharon1, Author
Reiss, Allan L.1, 2, Author
Vrticka, Pascal3, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Pediatric Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Psychology, University of Essex, Colchester, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
4Research Group Social Stress and Family Health, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_3025667              

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Free keywords: Age; Attachment; Late childhood; Social cognitive affective neuroscience; fMRI
 Abstract: Attachment plays a key role in how children process information about the self and others. Here, we examined the neural bases of interindividual differences in attachment in late childhood and tested whether social cognition-related neural activity varies as function of age. In a small sample of 8-year-old to 12-year-old children (n = 21/19), we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure neural responses during social feedback processing and self-other distinction. Attachment was assessed using child self-report. The social feedback processing task presented smiling and angry faces either confirming or disconfirming written information about participant performance on a perceptual game. In addition to observing main effects of facial emotion and performance, an increase in age was related to a shift from negative (i.e., angry faces/bad performance) to positive (i.e., smiling faces/good performance) information processing in the left amygdala/hippocampus, bilateral fusiform face area, bilateral anterior temporal pole (ATP), and left anterior insula. There were no effects of attachment on social feedback processing. The self-other distinction task presented digital morphs between children's own faces and faces of their mother or stranger females. We observed differential activation in face processing and mentalizing regions in response to self and mother faces versus morphed faces. Furthermore, left ATP activity was associated with attachment anxiety such that greater attachment anxiety was related to a shift from heightened processing of self and mother faces to morphed faces. There were no effects of age on self-other distinction. We discuss our preliminary findings in the context of attachment theory and previous work on social evaluation and self-other processing.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-03-052020-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3758/s13415-020-00781-w
PMID: 32141028
PMC: PMC7266808
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Funding program : Open Access funding provided by Projekt DEAL
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Title: Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Austin, TX : Psychonomic Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 20 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 503 - 520 Identifier: ISSN: 1530-7026
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1530-7026