English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  A Galactic centre gravitational-wave Messenger

Abramowicz, M., Bejger, M., Gourgoulhon, É., & Straub, O. (2020). A Galactic centre gravitational-wave Messenger. Scientific Reports, 10(1): 7054. doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63206-1.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-A204-E Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-A205-D
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
A Galactic centre gravitational-wave Messenger.pdf (Any fulltext), 2MB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
A Galactic centre gravitational-wave Messenger.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Private
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Abramowicz, Marek, Author
Bejger, Michał, Author
Gourgoulhon, Éric, Author
Straub, Odele1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Infrared and Submillimeter Astronomy, MPI for Extraterrestrial Physics, Max Planck Society, ou_159889              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Our existence in the Universe resulted from a rare combination of circumstances. The same must hold for any highly developed extraterrestrial civilisation, and if they have ever existed in the Milky Way, they would likely be scattered over large distances in space and time. However, all technologically advanced species must be aware of the unique property of the galactic centre: it hosts Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the closest supermassive black hole to anyone in the Galaxy. A civilisation with sufficient technical know-how may have placed material in orbit around Sgr A* for research, energy extraction, and communication purposes. In either case, its orbital motion will necessarily be a source of gravitational waves. We show that a Jupiter-mass probe on the retrograde innermost stable circular orbit around Sgr A* emits, depending on the black hole spin, at a frequency of fGW = 0.63–1.07 mHz and with a power of PGW = 2.7 × 1036–2.0 × 1037 erg/s. We discuss that the energy output of a single star is sufficient to stabilise the location of an orbiting probe for a billion years against gravitational wave induced orbital decay. Placing and sustaining a device near Sgr A* is therefore astrophysically possible. Such a probe will emit an unambiguously artificial continuous gravitational wave signal that is observable with LISA-type detectors.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-04-27
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41598-020-63206-1
Other: LOCALID: 3240619
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Scientific Reports
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Springer Nature
Pages: 10 Volume / Issue: 10 (1) Sequence Number: 7054 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2045-2322