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  Characterizing niche differentiation among marine consumers with amino acid δ13C fingerprinting

Larsen, T., Hansen, T., & Dierking, J. (2020). Characterizing niche differentiation among marine consumers with amino acid δ13C fingerprinting. Ecology and Evolution, 3.6502. doi:10.1002/ece3.6502.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-AA3B-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-ACE6-5
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Larsen, Thomas1, Author              
Hansen, Thomas, Author
Dierking, Jan, Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Baltic Sea, carbon stable isotopes, diet partitioning, fish diets, food web reconstruction, migration tracking, phytoplankton, predator–prey dynamics
 Abstract: Abstract Marine food webs are highly compartmentalized, and characterizing the trophic niches among consumers is important for predicting how impact from human activities affects the structuring and functioning of marine food webs. Biomarkers such as bulk stable isotopes have proven to be powerful tools to elucidate trophic niches, but they may lack in resolution, particularly when spatiotemporal variability in a system is high. To close this gap, we investigated whether carbon isotope (δ13C) patterns of essential amino acids (EAAs), also termed δ13CAA fingerprints, can characterize niche differentiation in a highly dynamic marine system. Specifically, we tested the ability of δ13CAA fingerprints to differentiate trophic niches among six functional groups and ten individual species in the Baltic Sea. We also tested whether fingerprints of the common zooplanktivorous fishes, herring and sprat, differ among four Baltic Sea regions with different biochemical conditions and phytoplankton assemblages. Additionally, we investigated how these results compared to bulk C and N isotope data for the same sample set. We found significantly different δ13CAA fingerprints among all six functional groups. Species differentiation was in comparison less distinct, due to partial convergence of the species' fingerprints within functional groups. Herring and sprat displayed region-specific δ13CAA fingerprints indicating that this approach could be used as a migratory marker. Niche metrics analyses showed that bulk isotope data had a lower power to differentiate between trophic niches than δ13CAA fingerprinting. We conclude that δ13CAA fingerprinting has a strong potential to advance our understanding of ecological niches, and trophic linkages from producers to higher trophic levels in dynamic marine systems. Given how management practices of marine resources and habitats are reshaping the structure and function of marine food webs, implementing new and powerful tracer methods are urgently needed to improve the knowledge base for policy makers.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-06-30
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 15
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: 1. Introduction

2. Material and methods
2.1 Study system
2.2 Fauna sampling
2.3 Phytoplankton
2.4 Stable isotope analysis
2.5 Statistical analyses.

3. Results
3.1 Biosynthetic origins of the essential amino acids
3.2 Differentiating functional groups and species with δ13CEAA fingerprinting
3.3 δ13CEAA fingerprints across Batic regions
3.4 Niche differentiation with compound and bulk isotope methods

4. Discussion
4.1 Understanding niche differnetiation and resource partioning with CSIA
4.2 Assessing spatial differences in marine consumers and food webs with CSIA
4.3 Dietary niche differnetiation with compound-specific and bulk isotope approaches
4.4 Perspectives
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/ece3.6502
Other: shh2653
 Degree: -

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Title: Ecology and Evolution
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 3.6502 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2045-7758
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2045-7758