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  Climate shaped how Neolithic farmers and European hunter-gatherers interacted after a major slowdown from 6,100 BCE to 4,500 BCE

Betti, L., Beyer, R. M., Jones, E. R., Eriksson, A., Tassi, F., Siska, V., et al. (2020). Climate shaped how Neolithic farmers and European hunter-gatherers interacted after a major slowdown from 6,100 BCE to 4,500 BCE. Nature Human Behaviour, s41562-020-0897-7. doi:10.1038/s41562-020-0897-7.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-B61F-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-B693-6
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Betti, Lia, Author
Beyer, Robert M., Author
Jones, Eppie R., Author
Eriksson, Anders, Author
Tassi, Francesca, Author
Siska, Veronika, Author
Leonardi, Michela, Author
Maisano Delser, Pierpaolo, Author
Bentley, Lily K., Author
Nigst, Philip R., Author
Stock, Jay T.1, Author              
Pinhasi, Ron, Author
Manica, Andrea, Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Archaeology, Biological anthropology, Palaeoclimate, Palaeoecology, Population dynamics
 Abstract: The Neolithic transition in Europe was driven by the rapid dispersal of Near Eastern farmers who, over a period of 3,500 years, brought food production to the furthest corners of the continent. However, this wave of expansion was far from homogeneous, and climatic factors may have driven a marked slowdown observed at higher latitudes. Here, we test this hypothesis by assembling a large database of archaeological dates of first arrival of farming to quantify the expansion dynamics. We identify four axes of expansion and observe a slowdown along three axes when crossing the same climatic threshold. This threshold reflects the quality of the growing season, suggesting that Near Eastern crops might have struggled under more challenging climatic conditions. This same threshold also predicts the mixing of farmers and hunter-gatherers as estimated from ancient DNA, suggesting that unreliable yields in these regions might have favoured the contact between the two groups.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-07-06
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 17
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Results
Discussion
Methods (Archaeological dates of first arrival of the Neolithic, Palaeoclimate reconstructions, Admixture with hunter-gatherers, Density of hunter-gatherer archaeological sites)
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41562-020-0897-7
Other: shh2657
 Degree: -

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Title: Nature Human Behaviour
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Nature Research
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: s41562-020-0897-7 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2397-3374
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2397-3374