English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Taphonomy and chronosequence of the 709 ka Kalinga site formation (Luzon Island, Philippines)

Ingicco, T., Reyes, M. C., de Vos, J., Belarmino, M., Albers, P. C. H., Lipardo, I., et al. (2020). Taphonomy and chronosequence of the 709 ka Kalinga site formation (Luzon Island, Philippines). Scientific Reports, 10(1): s41598-020-68066-3. doi:10.1038/s41598-020-68066-3.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-B642-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-B643-1
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
shh2658.pdf (Publisher version), 14MB
Name:
shh2658.pdf
Description:
OA
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Ingicco, T., Author
Reyes, M. C., Author
de Vos, J., Author
Belarmino, M., Author
Albers, P. C. H., Author
Lipardo, I., Author
Gallet, X., Author
Amano, Noel1, Author              
van den Bergh, G. D., Author
Cosalan, A. D., Author
Bautista, A., Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Archaeology, Natural hazards
 Abstract: The recently described site of Kalinga in the Philippines adds to our understanding of Early-Middle Pleistocene hominin behaviour. Yet, disentangling the natural from the anthropogenic modifications that have taken place in such an old archaeological site is challenging. In this paper we use a set of taphonomic tools at hand to rectify the distortion made by natural processes during the formation of the Kalinga site. From the description of the ribs completeness, surface damages and scattering in the excavation, one can reconstruct the butchery, transport and deposition sequence of the rhino carcass and its post-depositional disturbances and diagenetic evolution of the site. We conclude that the rhino and the stone artefacts potentially used to deflesh the carcass were transported by a mudflow from its butchery place over a few meters only and got stuck and mixed with an older faunal assemblage that was transported by a small stream.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-07-06
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 17
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Materials and methods
Results
Discussion and concluding remarks: Death and butchery of the rhino ; Transport and deposition ; Post‑depositional evolution of the site and diagenesis ; The relative age of the stone artefacts
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41598-020-68066-3
Other: shh2658
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Scientific Reports
  Abbreviation : Sci. Rep.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London, UK : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: 11081 Volume / Issue: 10 (1) Sequence Number: s41598-020-68066-3 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2045-2322
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2045-2322