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  The earliest domestic cat on the Silk Road

Haruda, A. F., Ventresca Miller, A. R., Paijmans, J. L. A., Barlow, A., Tazhekeyev, A., Bilalov, S., et al. (2020). The earliest domestic cat on the Silk Road. Scientific Reports, 10(1): 11241. doi:10.1038/s41598-020-67798-6.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-BA99-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-BA9A-B
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Haruda, A. F., Author
Ventresca Miller, Alicia R.1, Author              
Paijmans, J. L. A., Author
Barlow, A., Author
Tazhekeyev, A., Author
Bilalov, S., Author
Hesse, Y., Author
Preick, M., Author
King, T., Author
Thomas, R., Author
Härke, H., Author
Arzhantseva, I., Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Archaeology, Genetic variation, Stable isotope analysis
 Abstract: We present the earliest evidence for domestic cat (Felis catus L., 1758) from Kazakhstan, found as a well preserved skeleton with extensive osteological pathologies dating to 775–940 cal CE from the early medieval city of Dzhankent, Kazakhstan. This urban settlement was located on the intersection of the northern Silk Road route which linked the cities of Khorezm in the south to the trading settlements in the Volga region to the north and was known in the tenth century CE as the capital of the nomad Oghuz. The presence of this domestic cat, presented here as an osteobiography using a combination of zooarchaeological, genetic, and isotopic data, provides proxy evidence for a fundamental shift in the nature of human-animal relationships within a previously pastoral region. This illustrates the broader social, cultural, and economic changes occurring within the context of rapid urbanisation during the early medieval period along the Silk Road.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-07-09
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 12
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Zooarchaeological recovery and analysis
Genetics: identifying ancestry
Stable isotopes: feline diet, ecological context, and urban provisioning
Palaeopathologies: evidence for human care
Discussion
Methods (zooarchaeological recording, genetic analyses, isotopes)
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41598-020-67798-6
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.3490934
Other: shh2659
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Title: Scientific Reports
  Abbreviation : Sci. Rep.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 (1) Sequence Number: 11241 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2045-2322
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2045-2322