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  Tropical foodways and exchange along the coastal margin of Northeastern New Guinea

Gaffney, D., Greig, K., Stoddart, D., Tromp, M., Field, J. H., Luu, S., et al. (2020). Tropical foodways and exchange along the coastal margin of Northeastern New Guinea. Journal of Field Archaeology, 1786285. doi:10.1080/00934690.2020.1786285.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-BDBF-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-BDC0-C
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Gaffney, Dylan, Author
Greig, Karen, Author
Stoddart, Debbie, Author
Tromp, Monica1, Author              
Field, Judith H. , Author
Luu, Sindy, Author
Coster, Adelle C. F., Author
Russell, Tristan, Author
Mandui, Herman, Author
Summerhayes, Glenn R., Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: dental calculus analysis; starch analysis; pottery residue; zooarchaeology; Madang; Pacific
 Abstract: New Guinea was host to some of the most complex maritime interaction networks in the tropics. We take a multi-proxy approach to investigate the foodways at the heart of the extensive Madang exchange network in the last millennium before the present: 1) invertebrate zooarchaeological analysis identifies the dependence on shellfish collecting from the coral reef and sandy floor littoral zone; 2) examination of vertebrate remains demonstrates the rearing and consumption of key domesticated animals (pigs and perhaps dogs), alongside reef fish, birds, and possibly snakes; 3) human dental calculus analysis distinguishes that marine plants, palm, betelnut, and probably banana were consumed; 4) pottery residue analysis suggests that a variety of starchy crops were being cooked in locally made ceramics. We use this information to develop interpretations about the nature of land-use, mobility, and exchange along New Guinea’s coastal fringe, as well as how foodways have transformed throughout the Late Holocene.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-07-09
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 15
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Introduction

Marginal Food Production and Subsistence Trading in Northeastern New Guinea

Archaeological Context

Method: Vertebrate faunal analysis, Dental calculus analysis, Pottery residue analysis

Results: Invertebrate remains, Vertebrate remains, Dental calculus, Pottery residues

Discussion: Food production, land-use, and exchange at Tilu, Transformations to Late Holocene foodways

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 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1080/00934690.2020.1786285
Other: shh2662
 Degree: -

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Title: Journal of Field Archaeology
  Other : J. Field Archaeol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Boston : Boston University.
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 1786285 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0093-4690
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925464191