English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Transplanting institutional innovation: comparing the success of NGOs and missionary Protestantism in sub-Saharan Africa

Burchardt, M., & Swidler, A. (2020). Transplanting institutional innovation: comparing the success of NGOs and missionary Protestantism in sub-Saharan Africa. Theory and Society, 49(3), 335-364. doi:10.1007/s11186-020-09380-7.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
OA_Burchardt_2020_Transplanting.pdf (Any fulltext), 538KB
Name:
OA_Burchardt_2020_Transplanting.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Burchardt, Marian1, Author              
Swidler , Ann, Author
Affiliations:
1Fellow Group Governance of Cultural Diversity, MPI for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity, Max Planck Society, ou_1520137              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Africa.Development.Institutionalism.Institutional transfer.MissionaryProtestantism.NGOs.Pentecostalism
 Abstract: Viewing missionary Protestantism and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) ascarriers of transnational institutional innovation, this article compares their successesand failures at creating self-sustaining institutions in distant societies. MissionaryProtestantism and NGOs are similar in that they attempt to establish formal organiza-tions outside kinship, lineage, and ethnic forms of solidarity. Focusing on institutions asways to create collective capacities that organize social life, we trace the route wherebyProtestant missionaries established congregational religion in Africa and identify socialpractices that made this enterprise successful but are comparatively absent in currentNGO attempts to transform organizational life. Largely ignored by sociologists inter-ested in institutional transformation, the history of congregational religion offersvaluable sociological lessons about the conditions for radical institutional innovation.Its success was rooted first, in colonial missionaries’ability to enforce new ways of lifeon small exemplary communities; second, in local adaptations (African propheticmovements, Pentecostalism) that deepened and widened the social reach of congrega-tional principles; and third in the incentives Protestantism created for propagating thecongregational form.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-02-072020-04
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s11186-020-09380-7
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Theory and Society
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 49 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 335 - 364 Identifier: -