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  Prehistoric agriculture and social structure in the southwestern Tarim Basin: multiproxy analyses at Wupaer

Yang, Q., Zhou, X., Spengler III, R. N., Zhao, K., Liu, J., Bao, Y., et al. (2020). Prehistoric agriculture and social structure in the southwestern Tarim Basin: multiproxy analyses at Wupaer. Scientific Reports, 10(1): 14235, pp. 1-11. Retrieved from 10.1038/s41598-020-70515-y.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-F71A-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-F71B-6
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Yang, Qingjiang, Author
Zhou, Xinying, Author
Spengler III, Robert N.1, Author              
Zhao, Keliang, Author
Liu, Junchi, Author
Bao, Yige, Author
Jia, Peter Weiming, Author
Li, Xiaoqiang, Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Archaeology, Palaeontology
 Abstract: The oasis villages of the Tarim Basin served as hubs along the ancient Silk Road, and they played an important role in facilitating communication between the imperial centers of Asia. These villages were supported by an irrigated form of cereal farming that was specifically adapted to these early oasis settlements. In this manuscript, we present the results from new archaeobotanical analyses, radiocarbon dating, and organic carbon isotopic studies directly from carbonized seeds at the Wupaer site (1500–400 BC) in the Kashgar Oasis of the western Tarim Basin. Our results showed that early farming in the oasis relied on a mixed wheat and barley system, but after 1200 BC was intensified through more elaborate irrigation, the introduction of more water-demanding legumes, and possibly a greater reliance on free-threshing wheat. These crops and the knowledge of irrigated farming likely dispersed into the Tarim Basin through the mountains from southern Central Asia. Improved agricultural productivity in the Tarim Basin may also have led to demographic and socio-political shifts and fed into the increased exchange that is colloquially referred to as the Silk Road.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-08-28
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 11
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Results
- Chronology.
- Carbonized seeds.
- Barley (Hordeum vulgare).
- Wheat (Triticum aestivum or T. aestivum/turgidum).
- Millets.
- Wild and domesticated Fabaceae.
- Organic carbon isotope rations in ancient grains.

Discussion
- Agricultural strategies between 1500–400 BC in the southwestern Tarim Basin.
- Water management in the Tarim Basin.
- The emergence of city‑states in the Taklimakan Desert.

Methods
- Radiocarbon dating.
- Archaeobotanical analyses.
- Carbon isotope analysis.
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: URI: 10.1038/s41598-020-70515-y
Other: shh2695
 Degree: -

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Title: Scientific Reports
  Abbreviation : Sci. Rep.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 (1) Sequence Number: 14235 Start / End Page: 1 - 11 Identifier: ISSN: 2045-2322
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2045-2322