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  Visual appearance modulates motor control in social interactions

de la Rosa, S., Meilinger, T., Streuber, S., Saulton, A., Fademrecht, L., Quiros-Ramirez, M., et al. (2020). Visual appearance modulates motor control in social interactions. Acta Psychologica, 210: 103168, pp. 1-9. doi:10.1016/j.actpsy.2020.103168.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-FA11-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-FA12-C
Genre: Journal Article

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de la Rosa, S1, 2, Author              
Meilinger, T1, 2, Author              
Streuber, S, Author              
Saulton, A1, 2, Author              
Fademrecht, L1, 2, Author              
Quiros-Ramirez, MA, Author
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, Author              
Bülthoff, I1, 2, Author              
Cañal-Bruland, R, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: The goal of new adaptive technologies is to allow humans to interact with technical devices, such as robots, in natural ways akin to human interaction. Essential for achieving this goal, is the understanding of the factors that support natural interaction. Here, we examined whether human motor control is linked to the visual appearance of the interaction partner. Motor control theories consider kinematic-related information but not visual appearance as important for the control of motor movements (Flash & Hogan, 1985; Harris & Wolpert, 1998; Viviani & Terzuolo, 1982). We investigated the sensitivity of motor control to visual appearance during the execution of a social interaction, i.e. a high-five. In a novel mixed reality setup participants executed a high-five with a three-dimensional life-size human- or a robot-looking avatar. Our results demonstrate that movement trajectories and adjustments to perturbations depended on the visual appearance of the avatar despite both avatars carrying out identical movements. Moreover, two well-known motor theories (minimum jerk, two-thirds power law) better predict robot than human interaction trajectories. The dependence of motor control on the human likeness of the interaction partner suggests that different motor control principles might be at work in object and human directed interactions.

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 Dates: 2020-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.actpsy.2020.103168
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Title: Acta Psychologica
  Other : Acta Psychol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 210 Sequence Number: 103168 Start / End Page: 1 - 9 Identifier: ISSN: 0001-6918
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925374822