English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Can bottom-up synthetic biology generate advanced drug-delivery systems?

Lussier, F., Staufer, O., Platzman, I., & Spatz, J. P. (2020). Can bottom-up synthetic biology generate advanced drug-delivery systems? Trends in Biotechnology, 1-12. doi:10.1016/j.tibtech.2020.08.002.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-FEC7-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-FEC8-B
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
TrendsBiotechnol_epub_2020_002.pdf (Any fulltext), 3MB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
TrendsBiotechnol_epub_2020_002.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Restricted (Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, MHMF; )
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Lussier, Felix1, Author              
Staufer, Oskar1, Author              
Platzman, Ilia1, Author              
Spatz, Joachim P.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Cellular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society, ou_2364731              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: bottom-up synthetic biology drug delivery droplet-based microfluidics
 Abstract: Nanomedicine has demonstrated the potential of nanotechnology in treating diseases by selectively targeting pathogenic cells and releasing their cargo on site, but the complexity of molecular engineering such drug-delivery vehicles impedes their broad application and clinical translation. New methodologies to generate more advanced and intelligent systems are required. Bottom-up synthetic biology, empowered by microfluidics, allows the conception of multifunctional cell-mimicking structures – such as synthetic exosomes – that showcase its ability to create sophisticated systems. Recently, considerable progress has been made towards the assembly of complex structures that can dynamically release therapeutics, sustain protein biosynthesis, and sense and interact with the nearby environment. These functionalities will propel the creation of advanced drug-delivery platforms. Creating a magic bullet that can selectively kill cancer cells while sparing nearby healthy cells remains one of the most ambitious objectives in pharmacology. Nanomedicine, which relies on the use of nanotechnologies to fight disease, was envisaged to fulfill this coveted goal. Despite substantial progress, the structural complexity of therapeutic vehicles impedes their broad clinical application. Novel modular manufacturing approaches for engineering programmable drug carriers may be able to overcome some fundamental limitations of nanomedicine. We discuss how bottom-up synthetic biology principles, empowered by microfluidics, can palliate current drug carrier assembly limitations, and we demonstrate how such a magic bullet could be engineered from the bottom up to ultimately improve clinical outcomes for patients.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-09-07
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 15
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.tibtech.2020.08.002
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Trends in Biotechnology
  Other : Trends Biotechnol.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Amsterdam, Netherlands : Elsevier Current Trends
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1 - 12 Identifier: ISSN: 0167-7799
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/110984180788411