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  Globular structure of the hypermineralized tissue in human femoral neck

Wang, Q., Tang, T., Cooper, D., Eltit, F., Fratzl, P., Guy, P., et al. (2020). Globular structure of the hypermineralized tissue in human femoral neck. Journal of Structural Biology, 212: 107606. doi:10.1016/j.jsb.2020.107606.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-05F7-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-081F-F
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Wang, Qiong, Author
Tang, Tengteng1, Author              
Cooper, David, Author
Eltit, Felipe, Author
Fratzl, Peter2, Author              
Guy, Pierre, Author
Wang, Rizhi, Author
Affiliations:
1Wolfgang Wagermaier, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, ou_1863296              
2Peter Fratzl, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, ou_1863294              

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Free keywords: Human femoral neck, hip fracture, hypermineralization, mineral globules, FIB-SEM, Synchrotron micro-CT
 Abstract: Bone becomes more fragile with ageing. Among many structural changes, a thin layer of highly mineralized and brittle tissue covers part of the external surface of the thin femoral neck cortex in older people and has been proposed to increase hip fragility. However, there have been very limited reports on this hypermineralized tissue in the femoral neck, especially on its ultrastructure. Such information is critical to understanding both the mineralization process and its contributions to hip fracture. Here, we use multiple advanced techniques to characterize the ultrastructure of the hypermineralized tissue in the neck across various length scales. Synchrotron radiation micro-CT found larger but less densely distributed cellular lacunae in hypermineralized tissue than in lamellar bone. When examined under FIB-SEM, the hypermineralized tissue was mainly composed of mineral globules with sizes varying from submicron to a few microns. Nano-sized channels were present within the mineral globules and oriented with the surrounding organic matrix. Transmission electron microscopy showed the apatite inside globules were poorly crystalline, while those at the boundaries between the globules had well-defined lattice structure with crystallinity similar to the apatite mineral in lamellar bone. No preferred mineral orientation was observed both inside each globule and at the boundaries. Collectively, we conclude based on these new observations that the hypermineralized tissue is non-lamellar and has less organized mineral, which may contribute to the high brittleness of the tissue.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-09-062020
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.jsb.2020.107606
PMID: 0595
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Title: Journal of Structural Biology
  Abbreviation : J. Struct. Biol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: San Diego, CA : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 212 Sequence Number: 107606 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1047-8477