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  Neurobiological origins of individual differences in mathematical ability

Skeide, M. A., Wehrmann, K., Emami, Z., Kirsten, H., Hartmann, A. M., & Rujescu, D. (2020). Neurobiological origins of individual differences in mathematical ability. PLoS Biology, 18(10): e3000871. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.3000871.

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 Creators:
Skeide, Michael A.1, Author              
Wehrmann, Katharina1, 2, 3, Author
Emami, Zahra1, 4, Author
Kirsten, Holger5, Author
Hartmann, Annette M.6, Author
Rujescu, Dan6, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
2Institute of Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Psychiatry, University of Bern, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              
4The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, ON, Canada, ou_persistent22              
5Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology (IMISE), University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6Clinic and Polyclinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Mathematical ability is heritable and related to several genes expressing proteins in the brain. It is unknown, however, which intermediate neural phenotypes could explain how these genes relate to mathematical ability. Here, we examined genetic effects on cerebral cortical volume of 3–6-year-old children without mathematical training to predict mathematical ability in school at 7–9 years of age. To this end, we followed an exploration sample (n = 101) and an independent replication sample (n = 77). We found that ROBO1, a gene known to regulate prenatal growth of cerebral cortical layers, is associated with the volume of the right parietal cortex, a key region for quantity representation. Individual volume differences in this region predicted up to a fifth of the behavioral variance in mathematical ability. Our findings indicate that a fundamental genetic component of the quantity processing system is rooted in the early development of the parietal cortex.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-04-092020-09-182020-10-22
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.3000871
PMID: 33090992
PMC: PMC7580992
Other: eCollection 2020
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Grant ID : M.FE.A.NEPF0001
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Funding organization : Fraunhofer Society

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Title: PLoS Biology
  Other : PLoS Biol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: San Francisco, California, US : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 18 (10) Sequence Number: e3000871 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1544-9173
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/111056649444170