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  Testosterone activates sexual dimorphism including male-typical carotenoid but not melanin plumage pigmentation in a female bird

Lindsay, W. R., Barron, D. G., Webster, M. S., & Schwabl, H. (2016). Testosterone activates sexual dimorphism including male-typical carotenoid but not melanin plumage pigmentation in a female bird. Journal of Experimental Biology, 219(19), 3091-3099. doi:10.1242/jeb.135384.

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Lindsay, W. R., Author
Barron, D. G., Author
Webster, M. S., Author
Schwabl, Hubert1, Author              
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1Washington State University Pullman, USA, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: In males it is frequently testosterone (T) that activates the expression of sexually selected morphological and behavioral displays, but the role of T in regulating similar traits in females is less clear. Here, we combine correlational data with results from T and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) manipulations in both sexes to assess the role of T in mediating sexually dimorphic coloration and morphology in the red-backed fairy-wren (Malurus melanocephalus). We show that: (1) natural variation in female expression of ornamental traits (darkened bills and red back feathers) is positively associated with age and circulating androgen titres, (2) females have the capacity to express most male-typical traits in response to exogenous T, including carotenoid-pigmented body plumage, shorter feathers, darkened bill and enlarged cloacal protuberance, but (3) appear constrained in production of male-typical melanin-pigmented plumage, and (4) low androgen levels during the pre-nuptial molt, probably because of low ovarian capacity for steroid production (or luteinizing hormone sensitivity), prevent females from developing male-like ornamentation. Thus, females appear to retain molecular mechanisms for hormonally regulated male-typical ornamentation, although these are rarely activated because of insufficient production of the hormonal signal.

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 Dates: 2016
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: Other: WOS:000385956100021
DOI: 10.1242/jeb.135384
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Title: Journal of Experimental Biology
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Published for the Company of Biologists Ltd. by the Cambridge University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 219 (19) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 3091 - 3099 Identifier: ISSN: 0022-0949
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/110992357319088