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  Human footprints provide snapshot of last interglacial ecology in the Arabian interior

Stewart, M., Clark-Wilson, R., Breeze, P. S., Janulis, K., Candy, I., Armitage, S. J., et al. (2020). Human footprints provide snapshot of last interglacial ecology in the Arabian interior. Science Advances, 6(38): eaba8940. doi:10.1126/sciadv.aba8940.

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Supplementary material includes: - Supplementary Texts S1 to S6 - Figs. S1 to S13 - Tables S1 to S17 - References

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 Creators:
Stewart, Mathew1, 2, Author              
Clark-Wilson, Richard, Author
Breeze, Paul S., Author
Janulis, Klint, Author
Candy, Ian, Author
Armitage, Simon J., Author
Ryves, David B., Author
Louys, Julien, Author
Duval, Mathieu, Author
Price, Gilbert J., Author
Cuthbertson, Patrick, Author
Bernal, Marco A., Author
Drake, Nick A.1, Author              
Alsharekh, Abdullah M., Author
Zahrani, Badr, Author
Al-Omari, Abdulaziz, Author
Roberts, Patrick1, Author              
Groucutt, Huw S.1, 2, Author              
Petraglia, Michael D.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              
2Max Planck Research Group Extreme Events, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_3262629              

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 Abstract: The nature of human dispersals out of Africa has remained elusive because of the poor resolution of paleoecological data in direct association with remains of the earliest non-African people. Here, we report hominin and non-hominin mammalian tracks from an ancient lake deposit in the Arabian Peninsula, dated within the last interglacial. The findings, it is argued, likely represent the oldest securely dated evidence for Homo sapiens in Arabia. The paleoecological evidence indicates a well-watered semi-arid grassland setting during human movements into the Nefud Desert of Saudi Arabia. We conclude that visitation to the lake was transient, likely serving as a place to drink and to forage, and that late Pleistocene human and mammalian migrations and landscape use patterns in Arabia were inexorably linked.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-09-18
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 11
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Introduction

Results and discussion
- Geology and geochronology
- Fossil and footprint evidence

Conclusions

Materials and methods
- Sedimentology and diatom analysis
-- Macroscale sedimentology
-- Micromophology
-- Diatom analysis
- OSL dating
-- Sample collection, preparation and analysis
- Electron spin resonance and U-series dating
-- Samples and sample preparation
-- EST dose evaluation
-- U-series analysis of dental tissues
-- Dose rate and age calculations
- Fossil and ichnofossils analysis
-- Fossil analysis
- Stable isotope analysis
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aba8940
Other: shh2706
 Degree: -

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Title: Science Advances
  Other : Sci. Adv.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Washington : AAAS
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 6 (38) Sequence Number: eaba8940 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2375-2548
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2375-2548