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  Structural and functional effects of hydrostatic pressure on centrosomes from vertebrate cells

Rousselet, A., Euteneuer, U., Bordes, N., Ruiz, T., Hui Bon Hua, G., & Bornens, M. (2001). Structural and functional effects of hydrostatic pressure on centrosomes from vertebrate cells. Cell Motility and the Cytoskeleton, 48, 262-276. doi:10.1002/cm.1014.

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 Creators:
Rousselet, Annie1, Author
Euteneuer, U.2, Author
Bordes, N.1, Author
Ruiz, Teresa3, Author           
Hui Bon Hua , G.4, Author
Bornens, M.1, Author
Affiliations:
1Laboratoire du cycle cellulaire et de la motilité, UMR144‐CNRS, Institut Curie, Paris, France, ou_persistent22              
2Adolf‐Butenandt‐Institut, Zellbiologie, Ludwig‐Maximilians‐Universität, München, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Structural Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max Planck Society, ou_2068291              
4INSERM U473, Bicêtre, France, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: centrosome; hydrostatic pressure; microtubule nucleation; centrosome duplication
 Abstract: n an attempt to better understand the role of centrioles in vertebrate centrosomes, hydrostatic pressure was applied to isolated centrosomes as a means to disassemble centriole microtubules. Treatments of the centrosomes were monitored by analyzing their protein composition, ultrastructure, their ability to nucleate microtubules from pure tubulin, and their capability to induce parthenogenetic development of Xenopus eggs. Moderate hydrostatic pressure (95 MPa) already affected the organization of centriole microtubules in isolated centrosomes, and also impaired microtubule nucleation. At higher pressure, the protein composition of the peri‐centriolar matrix (PCM) was also altered and the capacity to nucleate microtubules severely impaired. Incubation of the treated centrosomes in Xenopus egg extract could restore their capacity to nucleate microtubules after treatment at 95 MPa, but not after higher pressure treatment. However, the centriole structure was in no case restored. It is noteworthy that centrosomes treated with mild pressure did not allow parthenogenetic development after injection into Xenopus eggs, even if they had recovered their capacity to nucleate microtubules. This suggested that, in agreement with previous results, centrosomes in which centriole architecture is impaired, could not direct the biogenesis of new centrioles in Xenopus eggs. Centriole structure could also be affected by applying mild hydrostatic pressure directly to living cells. Comparison of the effect of hydrostatic pressure on cells at the G1/S border or on the corresponding cytoplasts suggests that pro‐centrioles are very sensitive to pressure. However, cells can regrow a centriole after pressure‐induced disassembly. In that case, centrosomes eventually recover an apparently normal duplication cycle although with some delay

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2000-10-052000-12-062001-03-202001-04-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 15
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/cm.1014
 Degree: -

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Title: Cell Motility and the Cytoskeleton
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: New York, NY : Liss
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 48 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 262 - 276 Identifier: ISSN: 0886-1544
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954927636467