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  'TB or not TB': the conundrum of pre-European contact tuberculosis in the Pacific

McDonald, S. K., Matisoo-Smith, E. A., Buckley, H. R., Walter, R. K., Aung, H. L., Collins, C. J., et al. (2020). 'TB or not TB': the conundrum of pre-European contact tuberculosis in the Pacific. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series B: Biological Sciences, 375(1812): 20190583. doi:10.1098/rstb.2019.0583.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-44A0-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-44A1-6
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
McDonald, Stella K., Author
Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth A., Author
Buckley, Helen R., Author
Walter, Ryan K., Author
Aung, Htein Linn, Author
Collins, Christopher J., Author
Cook, Gregory M., Author
Kardailsky, Olga, Author
Krause, Johannes1, Author              
Knapp, Michael, Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074310              

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Free keywords: Pacific settlement, palaeopathology, infectious disease, zoonosis, mycobacteria
 Abstract: Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health threat, infecting one-third of the world's population. Despite this prominence, the age, origin and spread of the disease have been topics of contentious debate. Molecular studies suggest that Mycobacterium tuberculosis ‘sensu stricto’, the most common strain of TB infecting humans today, originated in Africa and from there spread into Europe and Asia. The M. tuberculosis strains most commonly found across the Pacific and the Americas today are most closely related to European strains, supporting a hypothesis that the disease only reached these regions relatively recently via European sailors or settlers. However, this hypothesis is inconsistent with palaeopathological evidence of TB-like lesions in human remains from across the Pacific that predate European contact. Similarly, genetic evidence from pre-European South American mummies challenges the notion of a European introduction of the disease into the Pacific. Here, we review the complex evidence for the age and origin of TB in the Pacific, and discuss key gaps in our knowledge and how these may be addressed. This article is part of the theme issue ‘Insights into health and disease from ancient biomolecules’.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-10-052020-11-23
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 7
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: 1. Background

2. Tuberculosis in the Pacific
(a) Molecular evidence
(b) Palaeopathological evidence in the Pacific
(c) Reconciling molecular and palaeopathological evidence
(d) Sea mammals as potential vector for tuberculosis in the Pacific
(e) Alternative explanations for pre-contact tuberculosis in the Pacific
(f) Tuberculosis and the ‘second wave’ of migration into the Pacific
(g) Contact with the Americas?

3. Outlook and conclusion
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2019.0583
Other: shh2724
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Title: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series B: Biological Sciences
  Other : Philosophical Transactions B
  Abbreviation : Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B
Source Genre: Journal
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Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London : Royal Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 375 (1812) Sequence Number: 20190583 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0962-8436
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/963017382021_1