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  The southern Central Asian mountains as an ancient agricultural mixing zone: new archaeobotanical data from Barikot in the Swat valley of Pakistan

Spengler, R. N., Tang, L., Nayak, A., Boivin, N., & Olivieri, L. M. (2020). The southern Central Asian mountains as an ancient agricultural mixing zone: new archaeobotanical data from Barikot in the Swat valley of Pakistan. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, s00334-020-00798-8. doi:10.1007/s00334-020-00798-8.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-45B5-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-45B6-E
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Spengler, Robert N.1, Author              
Tang, Li1, Author              
Nayak, Ayushi1, Author              
Boivin, Nicole1, Author              
Olivieri, Luca Maria, Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Crop rotation cycles, Archaeobotany, Swat valley, Irrigation, Rice, Northern pakistan
 Abstract: The mountain foothills of inner Asia have served as a corridor of communication and exchange for at least five millennia, using historically documented trade routes such as the Silk Road and the Tea-Horse Road. Recent research has illustrated the important role that this mountain corridor played in the dispersal of crops and farming technology between northeast and southwest Asia 5,000 to 1,000 years ago. However, the role of the mountain valleys along the southern rim of the Pamirs and Himalaya in facilitating crop dispersals has not yet been fully explored. Notably, ongoing debates over secondary dispersals of Hordeum (barley) and Triticum (wheat) into China and the routes of dispersal for the East Asian crops Oryza sativa (rice), Prunus persica (peach) and P. armeniaca (apricot) into northern India are continuing topics of inquiry. In this article, we add to these discussions by focusing on archaeobotanical remains from the Barikot site (ca. 1200 bce–50 ce) in the Swat valley of northern Pakistan. The Swat valley is an ancient settlement zone in the Hindu Kush-Karakoram foothills, whose cultural features have always had a strong link with inner Asia. The archaeobotanical assemblage illustrates that a diverse array of crops, with origins across Asia, were cultivated around the same settlement. Additionally, these farmers likely implemented seasonal cropping cycles and irrigation that required various labour inputs and water management regimes.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-10-07
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 14
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Introduction

The Barikot site

Methods

Results

Agricultural diversification

The cultivation system
- Water-demanding crops
- Crop rotation cycles
- Arboriculture

Conclusions
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s00334-020-00798-8
Other: shh2726
 Degree: -

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Project name : FEDD
Grant ID : 851102
Funding program : Horizon 2020 (H2020)
Funding organization : European Commission (EC)

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Title: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany
  Other : Veget. Hist. Archaeobot.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Berlin? : Springer-International
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: s00334-020-00798-8 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0939-6314
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925571885