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  Snapshots in time: MicroCT scanning of pottery sherds determines early domestication of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) in East Africa

Barron, A., Fuller, D. Q., Stevens, C., Champion, L., Winchell, F., & Denham, T. (2020). Snapshots in time: MicroCT scanning of pottery sherds determines early domestication of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) in East Africa. Journal of Archaeological Science, 123: 105259, pp. 1-10. doi:10.1016/j.jas.2020.105259.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-550A-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-550B-E
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Barron, Aleese, Author
Fuller, Dorian Q.1, Author              
Stevens, Chris, Author
Champion, Louis, Author
Winchell, Frank, Author
Denham, Tim, Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Domestication episode, Spikelet base, MicroCT visualisation, Neolithic, Archaeobotany, Sudan
 Abstract: MicroCT visualisations of organic inclusions within pottery sherds from Khashm el Girba 23 (KG23), Sudan, reveal domesticated sorghum (Sorghum bicolor subsp. bicolor) at c. 3700–2900 BCE. The percentage of non-shattering spikelet bases was c. 73% of identifiable visualizations, with c. 27% representing wild types. These analyses demonstrate the domestication of sorghum is significantly earlier than suggested by previous archaeological research. These results also demonstrate that microCT scanning is a major qualitative and quantitative advance on pre-existing methods for the investigation of crop remains in pottery sherds, which hitherto have been reliant on surface impressions; it is non-destructive, provides higher resolution 3D imaging of organic inclusions, and enables greater archaeobotanical recovery of inclusions within a sherd. MicroCT analysis of ceramics, mudbrick and other building materials has considerable potential for improving the chronologies and resolution for the domestication of other cereals in the past.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-10-122020-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 10
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: 1. Introduction
1.1. A note on sorghum taxonomy
1.2. The archaeobotany of sorghum domestication

2. Methods

3. Results

4. Discussion
4.1. Augmented archaeobotanical recovery
4.2. Domestication episode for sorghum
4.3. Snapshots of early cultivation

5. Conclusion
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.jas.2020.105259
Other: shh2748
 Degree: -

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Title: Journal of Archaeological Science
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 123 Sequence Number: 105259 Start / End Page: 1 - 10 Identifier: ISSN: 0305-4403
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922648108