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  Isotopic and microbotanical insights into Iron Age agricultural reliance in the Central African rainforest

Bleasdale, M., Wotzka, H.-P., Eichhorn, B., Mercader, J., Styring, A., Zech, J., et al. (2020). Isotopic and microbotanical insights into Iron Age agricultural reliance in the Central African rainforest. Communications Biology, 3: 619. doi:10.1038/s42003-020-01324-2.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-571E-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-571F-6
Genre: Journal Article

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https://www.nature.com/articles/s42003-020-01324-2 (Supplementary material)
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 Creators:
Bleasdale, Madeleine1, Author              
Wotzka, Hans-Peter, Author
Eichhorn, Barbara, Author
Mercader, Julio1, Author              
Styring, Amy, Author
Zech, Jana1, Author              
Soto, María, Author
Inwood, Jamie, Author
Clarke, Siobhán, Author
Marzo, Sara, Author
Fiedler, Bianca1, Author              
Linseele, Veerle, Author
Boivin, Nicole L.1, Author              
Roberts, Patrick1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Archaeology, Stable isotope analysis
 Abstract: The emergence of agriculture in Central Africa has previously been associated with the migration of Bantu-speaking populations during an anthropogenic or climate-driven ‘opening’ of the rainforest. However, such models are based on assumptions of environmental requirements of key crops (e.g. Pennisetum glaucum) and direct insights into human dietary reliance remain absent. Here, we utilise stable isotope analysis (δ13C, δ15N, δ18O) of human and animal remains and charred food remains, as well as plant microparticles from dental calculus, to assess the importance of incoming crops in the Congo Basin. Our data, spanning the early Iron Age to recent history, reveals variation in the adoption of cereals, with a persistent focus on forest and freshwater resources in some areas. These data provide new dietary evidence and document the longevity of mosaic subsistence strategies in the region.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-10-27
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 10
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Results
- Faunal and human bone collagen
- Faunal and human tooth enamel
- Microbotanical remains dental calculus
- Charred food fragments from Bolondo
Discussion
Methods
- Stable isotope analysis of bone collagen
- Stable isotope analysis of tooth enamel
- Microparticle analysis of dental calculus from MTNW
- Stable isotope analysis of charred food fragments
- Statistics and reproducibility

 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s42003-020-01324-2
 Degree: -

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Title: Communications Biology
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Springer Nature
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 3 Sequence Number: 619 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2399-3642
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2399-3642