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  A model for the domestication of Panicum miliaceum (common, proso or broomcorn millet) in China

Stevens, C. J., Shelach-Lavi, G., Zhang, H., Teng, M., & Fuller, D. Q. (2021). A model for the domestication of Panicum miliaceum (common, proso or broomcorn millet) in China. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, 30(1): s00334-020-00804-z, pp. 21-33. doi:10.1007/s00334-020-00804-z.

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 Creators:
Stevens, Chris J., Author
Shelach-Lavi, Gideon, Author
Zhang, Hai, Author
Teng, Mingyu, Author
Fuller, Dorian Q.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Origins of agriculture, Cultivation, Neolithic, Palaeoethnobotany, Shattering, Grain size
 Abstract: This paper outlines a model for the domestication of Panicum miliaceum (broomcorn millet) in Northern China. Data from 43 archaeological sites indicate a continuous increase in average grain size between 6000 and 3300 bc. After this date there is a divergence, with grain size continuing to increase in some populations, while others show no further size increase. The initial increase in grain size is attributed to selection during domestication, while later divergence after 3300 bc is interpreted as resulting from post-domestication selection. Measurements of grains from two archaeological populations of P. ruderale, showed grains were longer in length by 3300 bc than the earliest grains of P. miliaceum. This suggests this sub-species includes many feral, weedy and/or introgressed forms of P. miliaceum and therefore is probably not entirely representative of the true wild ancestor. It is argued that changes from shattering to non-shattering are contemporary with increasing grain size and the commencement of cultivation. The window of P. miliaceum domestication is therefore likely to lie between 7000 and 3300 bc. However, it is probable that a lengthy period of millet harvesting and small-scale management preceded its domestication.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-10-282021-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 13
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Introduction
The current state of knowledge on millet domestication
Data analysis
Results
Discussion
Pathways towards domestication
- Selection for grain size
- Selection for non-shattering
Conclusion
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s00334-020-00804-z
Other: shh2758
 Degree: -

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Title: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany
  Other : Veget. Hist. Archaeobot.
  Subtitle : Proceedings of the 18th Conference of the International Work Group for Palaeoethnobotany, Lecce 2019
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Berlin? : Springer-International
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 30 (1) Sequence Number: s00334-020-00804-z Start / End Page: 21 - 33 Identifier: ISSN: 0939-6314
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925571885