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  Gut microbiota composition is associated with newborn functional brain connectivity and behavioral temperament

Kelsey, C., Prescott, S., McCulloch, J. A., Trinchieri, G., Valladares, T., Dreisbach, C., et al. (2021). Gut microbiota composition is associated with newborn functional brain connectivity and behavioral temperament. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 91, 472-486. doi:10.1016/j.bbi.2020.11.003.

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 Creators:
Kelsey, Caroline1, Author
Prescott, Stephanie2, Author
McCulloch, John A.3, Author
Trinchieri, Giorgio3, Author
Valladares, Tara4, Author
Dreisbach, Caitlin5, Author
Alhusen, Jeanne6, Author
Grossmann, Tobias7, 8, Author           
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, USA, ou_persistent22              
2Division of Developmental Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Boston Children's Hospital, MA, USA, ou_persistent22              
3Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA, ou_persistent22              
4National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA, ou_persistent22              
5College of Nursing, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA, ou_persistent22              
6School of Nursing, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, USA, ou_persistent22              
7Data Science Institute, Columbia University in the City of New York, NY, USA, ou_persistent22              
8Max Planck Research Group Early Social Development, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1356545              

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Free keywords: Default mode network; fNIRS; Fronto-parietal network; Functional connectivity; Homologous-interhemispheric network; Temperament
 Abstract: The gut microbiome appears to play an important role in human health and disease. However, only little is known about how variability in the gut microbiome contributes to individual differences during early and sensitive stages of brain and behavioral development. The current study examined the link between gut microbiome, brain, and behavior in newborn infants (N = 63; M [age] = 25 days). Infant gut microbiome diversity was measured from stool samples using metagenomic sequencing, infant functional brain network connectivity was assessed using a resting state functional near infrared spectroscopy (rs-fNIRS) procedure and infant behavioral temperament was assessed using parental report. Our results show that gut microbiota composition is linked to individual variability in brain network connectivity, which in turn mediated individual differences in behavioral temperament, specifically negative emotionality, among infants. Furthermore, virulence factors, possibly indexing pathogenic activity were associated with differences in brain network connectivity linked to negative emotionality. These findings provide novel insights into the early developmental origins of the gut microbiome-brain axis and its association with variability in important behavioral traits. This suggests that the gut microbiome is an important biological factor to consider when studying human development and health.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-10-272020-08-142020-11-012020-11-042021-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.bbi.2020.11.003
Other: epub 2020
PMID: 33157257
 Degree: -

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Title: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, Fla. : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 91 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 472 - 486 Identifier: ISSN: 0889-1591
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922649133