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  Shape-preserving erosion controlled by the graded microarchitecture of shark tooth enameloid

Amini, S., Razi, H., Seidel, R., Werner, D., White, W. T., Weaver, J. C., et al. (2020). Shape-preserving erosion controlled by the graded microarchitecture of shark tooth enameloid. Nature Communications, 11: 5971. doi:10.1038/s41467-020-19739-0.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-7E26-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-F021-4
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Amini, Shahrouz1, Author              
Razi, Hajar2, Author              
Seidel, Ronald3, Author              
Werner, Daniel4, Author              
White, William T., Author
Weaver, James C., Author
Dean, Mason N.3, Author              
Fratzl, Peter5, Author              
Affiliations:
1Shahrouz Amini, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, ou_3217681              
2Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, ou_1863285              
3Mason Dean, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, ou_3034230              
4Wolfgang Wagermaier, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, ou_1863296              
5Peter Fratzl, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, ou_1863294              

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Free keywords: Bioinspired materials; Biomechanics; Biomineralization; Characterization and analytical techniques
 Abstract: The teeth of all vertebrates predominantly comprise the same materials, but their lifespans vary widely: in stark contrast to mammals, shark teeth are functional only for weeks, rather than decades, making lifelong durability largely irrelevant. However, their diets are diverse and often mechanically demanding, and as such, their teeth should maintain a functional morphology, even in the face of extremely high and potentially damaging contact stresses. Here, we reconcile the dilemma between the need for an operative tooth geometry and the unavoidable damage inherent to feeding on hard foods, demonstrating that the tooth cusps of Port Jackson sharks, hard-shelled prey specialists, possess unusual microarchitecture that controls tooth erosion in a way that maintains functional cusp shape. The graded architecture in the enameloid provokes a location-specific damage response, combining chipping of outer enameloid and smooth wear of inner enameloid to preserve an efficient shape for grasping hard prey. Our discovery provides experimental support for the dominant theory that multi-layered tooth enameloid facilitated evolutionary diversification of shark ecologies.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-11-242020
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41467-020-19739-0
PMID: 0599
Other: M:\BM-Publications\2020\AminiNatComm_Shape-preservingErosion
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Title: Nature Communications
  Abbreviation : Nat. Commun.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Springer nature
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 11 Sequence Number: 5971 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2041-1723