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  Water management and wheat yields in ancient China: Carbon isotope discrimination of archaeological wheat grains

Xinying, Z., Lin, Z., Spengler III, R. N., Keliang, Z., Junchi, L., Xing, X., et al. (2020). Water management and wheat yields in ancient China: Carbon isotope discrimination of archaeological wheat grains. The Holocene, 0959683620970249. doi:10.1177/0959683620970249.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-7B4F-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-7B54-1
Genre: Journal Article

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Supplementary (PDF) (Supplementary material)
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(last checked: Nov. 2020)

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 Creators:
Xinying, Zhou, Author
Lin, Zhu, Author
Spengler III, Robert N.1, Author              
Keliang, Zhao, Author
Junchi, Liu, Author
Xing, Xu, Author
Yige, Bao, Author
Dodson, John, Author
Hai, Xu, Author
Xiaoqiang, Li, Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: agricultural transition, carbon isotope, climate change, crop exchange, human adaptation, wheat
 Abstract: The evaluation of ancient crop production and its response to climate change is key to exploring the ancient demographic and social changes. Wheat is currently the third most widely cultivated crop worldwide and was a major component across of the agricultural systems of the ancient Eurasia. In this study, the ?13C values of 116 charred wheat grains from 28 archaeological sites, with direct AMS 14C dating of 3952?±?66 to 389?±?73?cal yr BP, across northern China are reported. The result shows that the ?13C values estimated wheat yields ranged from 0.5 to 2.5?Mg?ha?1, during the past 4000?years. The water supply and grain yield of wheat cultivation is the highest in China during the Bronze Age; however, the water supply and yield were significantly affected by climate fluctuation in the middle-late Holocene. No significant long-term trend of increasing wheat yield is observed over this interval, but a correlation between ?13C values estimated wheat yield and cyclical climate changes can be noted.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-11-20
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 9
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Introduction
Materials and methods
- Ancient wheat grains
- Modern wheat grains
Water input and a statistical model to estimate ancient wheat yields
Results and discussion
- Different water supply strategies for the wheat cultivation of ancient Eurasia
- Spatial and temporal change of Δ Estimated Wheat yields in China
Conclusion
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1177/0959683620970249
Other: shh2778
 Degree: -

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Title: The Holocene
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Los Angeles, CA : Sage Publications
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 0959683620970249 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1477-0911
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925578075_1