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  The transition to a barley-dominant cultivation system in Tibet: First millennium BC archaeobotanical evidence from Bangga

Tang, L., Lu, H., Song, J., Wangdue, S., Chen, X., Zhang, Z., et al. (2021). The transition to a barley-dominant cultivation system in Tibet: First millennium BC archaeobotanical evidence from Bangga. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, 61: 101242. doi:10.1016/j.jaa.2020.101242.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-8297-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-829A-8
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Tang, Li1, Author              
Lu, Hongliang, Author
Song, Jixiang, Author
Wangdue, Shargan, Author
Chen, Xinzhou, Author
Zhang, Zhengwei, Author
Liu, Xinyi, Author
Boivin, Nicole1, Author              
Spengler, Robert N.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Tibet, Barley, High elevation, Prehistory, Archaeobotany, Monocropping
 Abstract: Historically, agricultural and culinary traditions on the Tibetan Plateau have centered on a specific variety of naked frost-tolerant barley. Single-crop-dominant cultivation systems were rare in the ancient world, and we know little about how, why, and exactly when and where this unique barley-dominant economy developed. Previous research has shown that early cultivation systems in Tibet relied on a mix of barley, wheat, and millets, and that a barley-dominant economy first formed around two millennia ago. However, systematically collected data from the transition period between a mixed-cropping and a barley-dominant system have been lacking. We present new archaeobotanical data from the Bangga site (ca. 1055-211BC) in central Tibet, and compare it with a growing corpus of data from other archaeological sites at high elevations across the plateau. We argue that a specialized barley-dominant farming system started to develop, due to a combination of ecological and social factors, at least a millennia earlier than previously recognized in central Tibet and this was eventually adopted across a large geographic area in high-altitude regions (3500 masl) of Tibet.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-11-202021
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 11
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: 1. Introduction
1.1. Dispersal of barley eastward
1.2. Dispersal of barley into Tibet
2. The Bangga site
3. Material and methods
4. Results
5. Discussion
5.1. Transition to a barley-dominant economy
6. Driving factors of this specialized crops transition
6.1. Ecological factors
6.2. Social factors
7. Conclusion
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.jaa.2020.101242
 Degree: -

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Project name : FEDD
Grant ID : 851102
Funding program : Horizon 2020 (H2020)
Funding organization : European Commission (EC)

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Title: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 61 Sequence Number: 101242 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0278-4165
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/0278-4165