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  Increasing divergent thinking capabilities with music-feedback exercise

Fritz, T. H., Montgomery, M. A., Busch, E., Schneider, L., & Villringer, A. (2020). Increasing divergent thinking capabilities with music-feedback exercise. Frontiers in Psychology, 11: 578979. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2020.578979.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-9BB7-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-9BB8-B
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Fritz, Thomas Hans1, 2, Author              
Montgomery, Max Archibald1, 2, Author
Busch, Eric1, Author
Schneider, Lydia1, Author              
Villringer, Arno1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Institute for Psychoacoustics and Electronic Music, Ghent University, Belgium, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Athlete performance; Divergent thinking; Creativity; Jymmin; Musical agency; Neurology of music; Team sports; Athlete performance enhancement
 Abstract: Divergent thinking is an essential aspect of creativity and has been shown to be affected both by music and physical exercise. While it has been shown that making music and physical exercise can be beneficial for Divergent Thinking in isolation, it is unclear whether the effects can be combined. The present experiment investigated the relation of physical exertion and being in control of music on Divergent Thinking and the possibility of an interaction effect. Seventy-seven predominantly young, German participants were tested with measurements of Divergent Thinking collected after either (1) physical exercise with music listening, (2) making music with a knob setup without physical effort (music control only), or (3) making physical exercise with musical feedback (Jymmin™). Results showed greater increases in Divergent Thinking scores following music-feedback exercise compared to conditions of physical exercise with music listening and music control only. The data thus demonstrate that making music part of a physical exercise routine more strongly leads to the benefit of increased creative capacities, which we argue will be beneficial for athletes to prepare for certain types of competition/performance and as part of regeneration training.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-07-012020-10-132020-11-19
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.578979
Other: eCollection 2020
PMID: 33329231
PMC: PMC7710933
 Degree: -

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Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Pully, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 11 Sequence Number: 578979 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1664-1078