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  The mechanics of myeloid cells

Bashant, K. R., Toepfner, N., Day, C. J., Mehta, N. N., Kaplan, M. J., Summers, C., et al. (2020). The mechanics of myeloid cells. Biology of the Cell, 112(4), 103-112. doi:10.1111/boc.201900084.

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 Creators:
Bashant, Kathleen R.1, Author
Toepfner, Nicole1, Author
Day, Christopher J.1, Author
Mehta, Nehal N.1, Author
Kaplan, Mariana J.1, Author
Summers, Charlotte1, Author
Guck, Jochen2, 3, Author              
Chilvers, Edwin R.1, Author
Affiliations:
1external, ou_persistent22              
2Guck Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society, ou_3164416              
3Max-Planck-Zentrum für Physik und Medizin, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society, ou_3164414              

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Free keywords: cell motility; contraction; cell migration; adhesion; heart; lung; blood vessels; metastasis; disease
 Abstract: The effects of cell size, shape and deformability on cellular function have long been a topic of interest. Recently, mechanical phenotyping technologies capable of analysing large numbers of cells in real time have become available. This has important implications for biology and medicine, especially haemato-oncology and immunology, as immune cell mechanical phenotyping, immunologic function, and malignant cell transformation are closely linked and potentially exploitable to develop new diagnostics and therapeutics. In this review, we introduce the technologies used to analyse cellular mechanical properties and review emerging findings following the advent of high throughput deformability cytometry. We largely focus on cells from the myeloid lineage, which are derived from the bone marrow and include macrophages, granulocytes and erythrocytes. We highlight advances in mechanical phenotyping of cells in suspension that are revealing novel signatures of human blood diseases and providing new insights into pathogenesis of these diseases. The contributions of mechanical phenotyping of cells in suspension to our understanding of drug mechanisms, identification of novel therapeutics and monitoring of treatment efficacy particularly in instances of haematologic diseases are reviewed, and we suggest emerging topics of study to explore as high throughput deformability cytometers become prevalent in laboratories across the globe.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-04
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/boc.201900084
 Degree: -

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Title: Biology of the Cell
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Wiley
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 112 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 103 - 112 Identifier: ISSN: 0248-4900