English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
 
 
DownloadE-Mail
  Restriction of cytosolic sucrose hydrolysis profoundly alters development, metabolism and gene expression in Arabidopsis roots

Pignocchi, C., Ivakov, A., Feil, R., Trick, M., Pike, M., Wang, T. L., et al. (2020). Restriction of cytosolic sucrose hydrolysis profoundly alters development, metabolism and gene expression in Arabidopsis roots. Journal of Experimental Botany, 72(5), 1850-1863. doi:10.1093/jxb/eraa581.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show
hide
Locator:
Link (Any fulltext)
Description:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Pignocchi, Cristina1, Author
Ivakov, A.2, Author              
Feil, R.2, Author              
Trick, Martin1, Author
Pike, Marilyn1, Author
Wang, Trevor L1, Author
Lunn, J. E.2, Author              
Smith, Alison M1, Author
Affiliations:
1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              
2System Regulation, Department Stitt, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society, ou_1753327              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Plant roots depend on sucrose imported from leaves as the substrate for metabolism and growth. Sucrose and hexoses derived from it are also signalling molecules that modulate growth and development, but the importance for signalling of endogenous changes in sugar levels is poorly understood. We report that reduced activity of cytosolic invertase, which converts sucrose to hexoses, leads to pronounced metabolic, growth and developmental defects in roots of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings. In addition to altered sugar and downstream metabolite levels, roots of cinv1 cinv2 mutants have reduced elongation rates, cell and meristem size, abnormal meristematic cell division patterns, and altered expression of thousands of genes of diverse functions. Provision of exogenous glucose to mutant roots repairs relatively few of the defects. The extensive transcriptional differences between mutant and wild-type roots have hallmarks of both high sucrose and low hexose signalling. We conclude that the mutant phenotype reflects both low carbon availability for metabolism and growth and complex sugar signals derived from elevated sucrose and depressed hexose levels in the cytosol of mutant roots. Such reciprocal changes in endogenous sucrose and hexose levels potentially provide rich information about sugar status that translates into flexible adjustments of growth and development.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-12
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/jxb/eraa581
BibTex Citekey: 10.1093/jxb/eraa581
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Journal of Experimental Botany
  Other : J. Exp. Bot
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Oxford : Oxford University Press [etc.]
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 72 (5) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1850 - 1863 Identifier: ISSN: 0022-0957
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925413883