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  Earliest Olduvai hominins exploited unstable environments ~ 2 million years ago

Mercader, J., Akuku, P., Boivin, N., Bugumba, R., Bushozi, P., Camacho, A., et al. (2021). Earliest Olduvai hominins exploited unstable environments ~ 2 million years ago. Nature Communications, 12(1): 3. doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20176-2.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-ADC9-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-ADCA-3
Genre: Journal Article

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Supplementary Fig. 1: Stratigraphic correlation of Bed I near Ewass Oldupa (Loc. 63) ; Supplementary Fig. 2: Lithic analysis ; Supplementary Fig. 3: Score Plots for Principal Components 1, 2, and 3 ; Supplementary Fig. 4: Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence analysis of quartzite artefacts and raw material ; Supplementary Fig. 5: Phytolith Analysis ; Supplementary Fig. 6: Stable carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18O) measurements of animal teeth from Ewass Oldupa (below Tuff IA) ; Supplementary Table 1: Stone tool technological breakdown per trench at Ewass Oldupa ; Supplementary Table 2: Descriptive statistics for stone tool assemblages from selected sites ; Supplementary Table 3: Provenance, classification, and isotopic values in animal teeth from Ewass Oldupa ; Supplementary Table 4: Number of identified faunal specimens at Ewass Oldupa ; Supplementary Note 1: Faunal Taphonomy ; Supplementary References. - (last seen: Jan. 2021
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Reporting summary (Supplementary material)
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 Creators:
Mercader, Julio1, Author              
Akuku, Pam, Author
Boivin, Nicole1, Author              
Bugumba, Revocatus, Author
Bushozi, Pastory, Author
Camacho, Alfredo, Author
Carter, Tristan, Author
Clarke, Siobhán, Author
Cueva-Temprana, Arturo1, Author              
Durkin, Paul, Author
Favreau, Julien, Author
Fella, Kelvin, Author
Haberle, Simon, Author
Hubbard, Stephen, Author
Inwood, Jamie, Author
Itambu, Makarius, Author
Koromo, Samson, Author
Lee, Patrick, Author
Mohammed, Abdallah, Author
Mwambwiga, Aloyce, Author
Olesilau, Lucas, AuthorPatalano, Robert1, Author              Roberts, Patrick1, Author              Rule, Susan, AuthorSaladie, Palmira, AuthorSiljedal, Gunnar, AuthorSoto, María, AuthorUmbsaar, Jonathan, AuthorPetraglia, Michael1, Author               more..
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Archaeology, Biological anthropology, Palaeoecology, Palaeontology
 Abstract: Rapid environmental change is a catalyst for human evolution, driving dietary innovations, habitat diversification, and dispersal. However, there is a dearth of information to assess hominin adaptions to changing physiography during key evolutionary stages such as the early Pleistocene. Here we report a multiproxy dataset from Ewass Oldupa, in the Western Plio-Pleistocene rift basin of Olduvai Gorge (now Oldupai), Tanzania, to address this lacuna and offer an ecological perspective on human adaptability two million years ago. Oldupai’s earliest hominins sequentially inhabited the floodplains of sinuous channels, then river-influenced contexts, which now comprises the oldest palaeolake setting documented regionally. Early Oldowan tools reveal a homogenous technology to utilise diverse, rapidly changing environments that ranged from fern meadows to woodland mosaics, naturally burned landscapes, to lakeside woodland/palm groves as well as hyper-xeric steppes. Hominins periodically used emerging landscapes and disturbance biomes multiple times over 235,000 years, thus predating by more than 180,000 years the earliest known hominins and Oldowan industries from the Eastern side of the basin.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-01-07
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 15
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Introduction
Results
- Stratigraphy and archaeology
- Early Oldowan ecology at ~ 2 Ma
Discussion
Methods
- Biomarkers
- Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence
- Excavation
- Fauna
- Mineral geochemistry
- Phytolith analysis
- Pollen and microcharcoal
- Stable carbon and oxygen isotope analysis of faunal dental enamel
- Stone tools


 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41467-020-20176-2
Other: shh2811
 Degree: -

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Title: Nature Communications
  Abbreviation : Nat. Commun.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 12 (1) Sequence Number: 3 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2041-1723
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2041-1723