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  Predatory feeding behaviour in Pristionchus nematodes is dependent on phenotypic plasticity and induced by serotonin

Wilecki, M., Lightfoot, J. W., Susoy, V., & Sommer, R. J. (2015). Predatory feeding behaviour in Pristionchus nematodes is dependent on phenotypic plasticity and induced by serotonin. Journal of Experimental Biology, 218(9), 1306-1313. doi:10.1242/jeb.118620.

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Wilecki, Martin1, Author
Lightfoot, James W.1, Author           
Susoy, Vladislav1, Author
Sommer, Ralf J.1, Author
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_2421691              

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Free keywords: Developmental plasticity; Neurotransmitter; Predation behaviour; Pristionchus pacificus.
 Abstract: Behavioural innovation and morphological adaptation are intrinsically linked but their relationship is often poorly understood. In nematodes, a huge diversity of feeding morphologies and behaviours can be observed to meet their distinctive dietary and environmental demands. Pristionchus and their relatives show varied feeding activities, both consuming bacteria and also predating other nematodes. In addition, Pristionchus nematodes display dimorphic mouth structures triggered by an irreversible developmental switch, which generates a narrower mouthed form with a single tooth and a wider mouthed form with an additional tooth. However, little is known about the specific predatory adaptations of these mouth forms or the associated mechanisms and behaviours. Through a mechanistic analysis of predation behaviours, in particular in the model organism Pristionchus pacificus, we reveal multifaceted feeding modes characterised by dynamic rhythmic switching and tooth stimulation. This complex feeding mode switch is regulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin in a previously uncharacterised role, a process that appears conserved across several predatory nematode species. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of starvation, prey size and prey preference on P. pacificus predatory feeding kinetics, revealing predation to be a fundamental component of the P. pacificus feeding repertoire, thus providing an additional rich source of nutrition in addition to bacteria. Finally, we found that mouth form morphology also has a striking impact on predation, suppressing predatory behaviour in the narrow mouthed form. Our results therefore hint at the regulatory networks involved in controlling predatory feeding and underscore P. pacificus as a model for understanding the evolution of complex behaviours.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-05
 Publication Status: Issued
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: ISI: 000354115800012
DOI: 10.1242/jeb.118620
 Degree: -

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Title: Journal of Experimental Biology
  Abbreviation : J Exp Biol
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Published for the Company of Biologists Ltd. by the Cambridge University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 218 (9) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1306 - 1313 Identifier: ISSN: 0022-0949
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/110992357319088