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  Continuity of the Middle Stone Age into the Holocene

Scerri, E. M. L., Niang, K., Candy, I., Blinkhorn, J., Mills, W., Cerasoni, J. N., et al. (2021). Continuity of the Middle Stone Age into the Holocene. Scientific Reports, 11(1): 70. doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79418-4.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-B3F3-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-B3F9-6
Genre: Journal Article

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docx. - (last seen: Jan. 2021)

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 Creators:
Scerri, Eleanor M. L.1, Author              
Niang, Khady, Author
Candy, Ian, Author
Blinkhorn, James1, Author              
Mills, William, Author
Cerasoni, Jacopo Niccolò1, Author              
Bateman, Mark D., Author
Crowther, Alison2, Author              
Groucutt, Huw S.2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Lise Meitner Pan-African Evolution Research Group, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_3033582              
2Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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 Abstract: The African Middle Stone Age (MSA, typically considered to span ca. 300–30 thousand years ago [ka]), represents our species’ first and longest lasting cultural phase. Although the MSA to Later Stone Age (LSA) transition is known to have had a degree of spatial and temporal variability, recent studies have implied that in some regions, the MSA persisted well beyond 30 ka. Here we report two new sites in Senegal that date the end of the MSA to around 11 ka, the youngest yet documented MSA in Africa. This shows that this cultural phase persisted into the Holocene. These results highlight significant spatial and temporal cultural variability in the African Late Pleistocene, consistent with genomic and palaeoanthropological hypotheses that significant, long-standing inter-group cultural differences shaped the later stages of human evolution in Africa.

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 Dates: 2021-01-11
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 11
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Introduction
Results
Discussion
Materials and methods
- Fieldwork
- OSL dating methodology
- Lithic analysis
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41598-020-79418-4
Other: shh2814
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Title: Scientific Reports
  Abbreviation : Sci. Rep.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 11 (1) Sequence Number: 70 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2045-2322
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2045-2322