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  Origins of modern human ancestry

Bergström, A., Stringer, C., Hajdinjak, M., Scerri, E. M. L., & Skoglund, P. (2021). Origins of modern human ancestry. Nature, 590(7845): s41586-021-03244-5, pp. 229-237. doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03244-5.

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 Creators:
Bergström, Anders, Author
Stringer, Chris, Author
Hajdinjak, Mateja , Author
Scerri, Eleanor M. L.1, 2, Author              
Skoglund, Pontus, Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              
2Lise Meitner Pan-African Evolution Research Group, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_3033582              

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Free keywords: Anthropology, Archaeology, Evolutionary genetics
 Abstract: New finds in the palaeoanthropological and genomic records have changed our view of the origins of modern human ancestry. Here we review our current understanding of how the ancestry of modern humans around the globe can be traced into the deep past, and which ancestors it passes through during our journey back in time. We identify three key phases that are surrounded by major questions, and which will be at the frontiers of future research. The most recent phase comprises the worldwide expansion of modern humans between 40 and 60 thousand years ago (ka) and their last known contacts with archaic groups such as Neanderthals and Denisovans. The second phase is associated with a broadly construed African origin of modern human diversity between 60 and 300 ka. The oldest phase comprises the complex separation of modern human ancestors from archaic human groups from 0.3 to 1 million years ago. We argue that no specific point in time can currently be identified at which modern human ancestry was confined to a limited birthplace, and that patterns of the first appearance of anatomical or behavioural traits that are used to define Homo sapiens are consistent with a range of evolutionary histories.

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 Dates: 2021-02-102021-02-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 9
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: Phase 3 and the worldwide expansion outside of Africa
- Early expansion hypotheses
- Episodes of gene flow from Eurasian archaic humans
- Gene flow from Neanderthals
- Gene flow from Denisovans
- The frequency of archaic admixture outside of Africa
Phase 2 and African origins
- The fossil record of modern human origins in Africa
- The time depth of modern human population structure
- Possible ‘archaic’ admixture in Africa
- The search for a modern human birthplace
- A possible Late Pleistocene expansion across Africa
Phase 1 and the divergence from archaic groups
- The last common ancestor of modern and archaic humans
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 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-03244-5
Other: shh2848
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Title: Nature
  Abbreviation : Nature
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 590 (7845) Sequence Number: s41586-021-03244-5 Start / End Page: 229 - 237 Identifier: ISSN: 0028-0836
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925427238