English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  The biological classification of mental disorders (BeCOME) study: a protocol for an observational deep-phenotyping study for the identification of biological subtypes

Brückl, T. M., Spoormaker, V. I., Sämann, P. G., Brem, A.-K., Henco, L., Czamara, D., et al. (2020). The biological classification of mental disorders (BeCOME) study: a protocol for an observational deep-phenotyping study for the identification of biological subtypes. BMC PSYCHIATRY, 20(1): 213. doi:10.1186/s12888-020-02541-z.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Brückl, Tanja M.1, Author           
Spoormaker, Victor I.1, Author           
Sämann, Philipp G.1, Author           
Brem, Anna-Katherine2, Author           
Henco, Lara3, Author           
Czamara, Darina1, Author           
Elbau, Immanuel1, Author           
Grandi, Norma Christine2, Author           
Jollans, Lee1, Author           
Kühnel, Anne1, Author           
Leuchs, Laura1, Author           
Pöhlchen, Dorothee1, Author           
Schneider, Maximilian1, Author           
Tontsch, Alina2, Author           
Keck, Martin E.2, Author           
Schilbach, Leonhard3, Author           
Czisch, Michael1, Author           
Lucae, Susanne2, Author           
Erhardt, Angelika1, Author           
Binder, Elisabeth B.1, Author           
Affiliations:
1Dept. Translational Research in Psychiatry, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society, ou_2035295              
2Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society, ou_1607137              
3Independent Max Planck Research Group Social Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society, ou_2253638              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER; RESEARCH DOMAIN CRITERIA; BIPOLAR-SCHIZOPHRENIA NETWORK; IV PERSONALITY-DISORDERS; WORKING-MEMORY; GERMAN VERSION; RESTING-STATE; PSYCHIATRIC-DISORDERS; CHILDHOOD TRAUMA; HUMAN FEARPsychiatry; Translational; Transdiagnostic; Psychiatry; Research domain criteria (RDoC); Neuroimaging; Omics; Biology-based taxonomy; Stress; Depression; Anxiety;
 Abstract: BackgroundA major research finding in the field of Biological Psychiatry is that symptom-based categories of mental disorders map poorly onto dysfunctions in brain circuits or neurobiological pathways. Many of the identified (neuro) biological dysfunctions are "transdiagnostic", meaning that they do not reflect diagnostic boundaries but are shared by different ICD/DSM diagnoses. The compromised biological validity of the current classification system for mental disorders impedes rather than supports the development of treatments that not only target symptoms but also the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. The Biological Classification of Mental Disorders (BeCOME) study aims to identify biology-based classes of mental disorders that improve the translation of novel biomedical findings into tailored clinical applications.MethodsBeCOME intends to include at least 1000 individuals with a broad spectrum of affective, anxiety and stress-related mental disorders as well as 500 individuals unaffected by mental disorders. After a screening visit, all participants undergo in-depth phenotyping procedures and omics assessments on two consecutive days. Several validated paradigms (e.g., fear conditioning, reward anticipation, imaging stress test, social reward learning task) are applied to stimulate a response in a basic system of human functioning (e.g., acute threat response, reward processing, stress response or social reward learning) that plays a key role in the development of affective, anxiety and stress-related mental disorders. The response to this stimulation is then read out across multiple levels. Assessments comprise genetic, molecular, cellular, physiological, neuroimaging, neurocognitive, psychophysiological and psychometric measurements. The multilevel information collected in BeCOME will be used to identify data-driven biologically-informed categories of mental disorders using cluster analytical techniques.DiscussionThe novelty of BeCOME lies in the dynamic in-depth phenotyping and omics characterization of individuals with mental disorders from the depression and anxiety spectrum of varying severity. We believe that such biology-based subclasses of mental disorders will serve as better treatment targets than purely symptom-based disease entities, and help in tailoring the right treatment to the individual patient suffering from a mental disorder. BeCOME has the potential to contribute to a novel taxonomy of mental disorders that integrates the underlying pathomechanisms into diagnoses.Trial registrationRetrospectively registered on June 12, 2019 on ClinicalTrials.gov (TRN: NCT03984084).

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 25
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: BMC PSYCHIATRY
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: CAMPUS, 4 CRINAN ST, LONDON N1 9XW, ENGLAND : BMC
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 20 (1) Sequence Number: 213 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -