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  Musical rhythm effects on visual attention are non-rhythmical: Evidence against metrical entrainment

Schirmer, A., Wijaya, M., Chiu, M. H., Maess, B., & Gunter, T. C. (2021). Musical rhythm effects on visual attention are non-rhythmical: Evidence against metrical entrainment. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 16(1-2), 58-71.

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 Creators:
Schirmer, Annett1, 2, Author
Wijaya, Maria1, Author
Chiu, Man Hey1, Author
Maess, Burkhard3, Author              
Gunter, Thomas C.4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China, ou_persistent22              
2Brain and Mind Institute, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China, ou_persistent22              
3Methods and Development Group Brain Networks, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_2205650              
4Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

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Free keywords: EEG; Entrainment; Foreperiod; Frequency tagging; Music; Tapping; Timing
 Abstract: The idea that external rhythms synchronize attention cross-modally has attracted much interest and scientific inquiry. Yet, whether associated attentional modulations are indeed rhythmical in that they spring from and map onto an underlying meter has not been clearly established. Here we tested this idea while addressing the shortcomings of previous work associated with confounding (i) metricality and regularity, (ii) rhythmic and temporal expectations or (iii) global and local temporal effects. We designed sound sequences that varied orthogonally (high/low) in metricality and regularity and presented them as task-irrelevant auditory background in four separate blocks. The participants' task was to detect rare visual targets occurring at a silent metrically aligned or misaligned temporal position. We found that target timing was irrelevant for reaction times and visual event-related potentials. High background regularity and to a lesser extent metricality facilitated target processing across metrically aligned and misaligned positions. Additionally, high regularity modulated auditory background frequencies in the EEG recorded over occipital cortex. We conclude that external rhythms, rather than synchronizing attention cross-modally, confer general, nontemporal benefits. Their predictability conserves processing resources that then benefit stimulus representations in other modalities.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-05-262020-01-222020-06-022020-06-082021-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: PMID: 32507877
PMC: PMC7812633
 Degree: -

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Project name : -
Grant ID : 14612318
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Hong Kong Research Grants Council

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Title: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
  Other : SCAN
  Abbreviation : Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford : Oxford University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 16 (1-2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 58 - 71 Identifier: ISSN: 1749-5016
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000223760