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  Neural synchrony in mother–child conversation: Exploring the role of conversation patterns

Nguyen, T., Schleihauf, H., Kayhan, E., Matthes, D., Vrticka, P., & Hoehl, S. (2021). Neural synchrony in mother–child conversation: Exploring the role of conversation patterns. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 16(1-2), 93-102. doi:10.1093/scan/nsaa079.

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 Creators:
Nguyen, Trinh1, Author
Schleihauf, Hanna2, 3, 4, Author
Kayhan, Ezgi5, 6, Author              
Matthes, Daniel6, Author              
Vrticka, Pascal7, 8, Author              
Hoehl, Stefanie1, 6, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Developmental and Educational Psychology, Faculty of Psychology, University Vienna, Austria, ou_persistent22              
2Cognitive Ethology Lab, German Primate Center, Göttingen, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department for Primate Cognition, Georg August University, Göttingen, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              
5Department of Developmental Psychology, University of Potsdam, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6Max Planck Research Group Early Social Cognition, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_2355694              
7Department of Psychology, University of Essex, Colchester, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
8Research Group Social Stress and Family Health, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_3025667              

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Free keywords: Conversation; Functional near-infrared spectroscopy; Hyperscanning; Mother–child interaction; Neural synchrony; Turn-taking
 Abstract: Conversations are an essential form of communication in daily family life. Specific patterns of caregiver-child conversations have been linked to children's socio-cognitive development and child-relationship quality beyond the immediate family environment. Recently, interpersonal neural synchronization has been proposed as a neural mechanism supporting conversation. Here, we present a functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) hyperscanning study looking at the temporal dynamics of neural synchrony during mother-child conversation. Preschoolers (20 boys and 20 girls, M age 5;07 years) and their mothers (M age 36.37 years) were tested simultaneously with fNIRS hyperscanning while engaging in a free verbal conversation lasting for 4 min. Neural synchrony (using wavelet transform coherence analysis) was assessed over time. Furthermore, each conversational turn was coded for conversation patterns comprising turn-taking, relevance, contingency and intrusiveness. Results from linear mixed-effects modeling revealed that turn-taking, but not relevance, contingency or intrusiveness predicted neural synchronization during the conversation over time. Results are discussed to point out possible variables affecting parent-child conversation quality and the potential functional role of interpersonal neural synchronization for parent-child conversation.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-06-022019-12-222020-06-082020-06-152021-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/scan/nsaa079
PMID: 32591781
PMC: PMC7812624
 Degree: -

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Project name : -
Grant ID : KA 4926/1-1
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)

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Title: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
  Other : SCAN
  Abbreviation : Soc Cogn Affect Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford : Oxford University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 16 (1-2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 93 - 102 Identifier: ISSN: 1749-5016
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000223760