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  Positioning of large organelles by a membrane- associated cytoskeleton in Plasmodium sporozoites

Kudryashev, M., Lepper, S., Stanway, R., Bohn, S., Baumeister, W., Cyrklaff, M., et al. (2010). Positioning of large organelles by a membrane- associated cytoskeleton in Plasmodium sporozoites. Cellular Microbiology, 12(3), 362-371. doi:10.1111/j.1462-5822.2009.01399.x.

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 Creators:
Kudryashev, Misha1, Author              
Lepper, Simone1, Author
Stanway, Rebecca2, Author
Bohn, Stefan1, 3, Author              
Baumeister, Wolfgang3, Author              
Cyrklaff, Marek3, Author              
Frischknecht, Friedrich1, Author
Affiliations:
1Parasitology, Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Heidelberg Medical School, Heidelberg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Parasitology, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Bernhard Nocht Strasse 74, 20359 Hamburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Baumeister, Wolfgang / Molecular Structural Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1565142              

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 Abstract: Cellular organelles are usually linked to the cytoskeleton, which often provides a scaffold for organelle function. In malaria parasites, no link between the cytoskeleton and the major organelles is known. Here we show that during fast, stop-and-go motion of Plasmodium sporozoites, all organelles stay largely fixed in respect to the moving parasite. Cryogenic electron tomography reveals that the nucleus, mitochondrion, apicoplast and the microtubules of Plasmodium sporozoites are linked to the parasite pellicle via long tethering proteins. These tethers originate from the inner membrane complex and are arranged in a periodic fashion following a 32 nm repeat. The tethers pass through a subpellicular structure that encompasses the entire parasite, probably as a network of membrane-associated filaments. While the spatial organization of the large parasite organelles appears dependent on their linkage to the cortex, the specialized secretory vesicles are mostly not linked to microtubules or other cellular structures that could provide support for movement.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2009-10-192009-07-022009-10-212009-12-062010-03-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 10
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/j.1462-5822.2009.01399.x
PMID: 19863555
 Degree: -

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Title: Cellular Microbiology
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Malden, MA : Blackwell Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 12 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 362 - 371 Identifier: ISSN: 1462-5814
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/959328105032