English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
 
 
DownloadE-Mail
  Archaeological and environmental cave records in the Gobi-Altai Mountains, Mongolia

Vanwezer, N., Breitenbach, S. F., Gázquez, F., Louys, J., Kononov, A., Sokol'nikov, D., et al. (2021). Archaeological and environmental cave records in the Gobi-Altai Mountains, Mongolia. Quaternary International, 586: 010, pp. 66-89. doi:10.1016/j.quaint.2021.03.010.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
shh2872.pdf (Publisher version), 25MB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
shh2872.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Private
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-
:
shh2872pre.pdf (Preprint), 47MB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
shh2872pre.pdf
Description:
Journal Pre-proof
Visibility:
Private
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Vanwezer, Nils1, Author              
Breitenbach, Sebastian F.M., Author
Gázquez, Fernando, Author
Louys, Julien, Author
Kononov, Aleksandr, Author
Sokol'nikov, Dmitry, Author
Erdenedalai, Avirmed, Author
Burguet-Coca, Aitor, Author
Picin, Andrea1, Author              
Cueva-Temprana, Arturo1, Author              
Sánchez-Martínez, Javier, Author
Taylor, William1, Author              
Boivin, Nicole1, Author              
Jamsranjav, Bayarsaikhan, Author
Petraglia, Michael D.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Geomorphology, Speleology, Survey, Holocene, Archaeology, Water stable isotopes
 Abstract: Though hundreds of caves are known across Mongolia, few have been subject to systematic, interdisciplinary archaeological surveys and excavations to understand Late Pleistocene and Holocene environments. Previous cave excavations in Mongolia have demonstrated their potential for preservation of archaeological and biological material, including Palaeolithic assemblages and Holocene archaeology, particularly burials, with associated organic finds. In other cases, cave surveys found that stratigraphic deposits and archaeological materials are absent. The large number of caves makes the Mongolian Altai Mountain Range a potentially attractive region for human occupation in the Pleistocene and Holocene. Here we present the results of an interdisciplinary survey of caves in four carbonate areas across the Gobi-Altai Mountains. We report 24 new caves, some of which contain archaeological material recovered through survey and test excavations. Most caves presented limited sedimentation, and some were likely too small for human habitation. Six caves showed evidence of palaeontological remains, mostly from likely late Holocene and recent periods. The most notable anthropogenic findings included petroglyphs at Gazar Agui 1 & 13. Gazar Agui 1 also contained lithics and a bronze fragment. Tsakhiryn Agui 1 contained 31 wooden fragments that include an unused fire drilling tool kit and items commonly found in association with medieval burials. We observed that the caves remain in contemporary use for religious and economic purposes, such as the construction of shrines, mining and animal corralling. Water samples from the caves, and nearby rivers, lakes, and springs were analysed for their isotopic compositions (δ18O, δD, δ17O, 17Oexcess, d-excess) and the data, combined with backward trajectory modelling revealed that the Gobi-Altai region receives moisture mainly from western sources. These results form a baseline for future archaeological, paleoclimate and palaeoecological studies about regional seasonality and land use.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-03-112021-06-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 24
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: 1. Introduction
2. Geographic background
2.1. Gobi-Altai Mountains
2.2. Biogeography
3. Materials and methods
3.1. Stable water isotopes
4. Results
4.1. Caves in the Tsakhiryn Nuruu (limestone mountains)
4.1.1. Tsakhiryn Agui 1
4.1.2. Tsakhiryn Agui 4
4.1.3. Irvesiin Agui
4.1.4. Tsakhiryn Agui 1b, 2, 3, 5
4.2. Caves of Aguin Nuruu
4.2.1. Nuramt Tsakhir Agui
4.2.2. Khongil Tsakhir Agui
4.3. Caves in the gazar region
4.3.1. Gazar Agui 1
4.3.2. Gazar Agui 2 & 3
4.3.3. Gazar Agui 13
4.3.4. Gazar Agui 4-12
4.4. Caves in the Saalit region
4.4.1. Saalit Agui 1
4.4.2. Saalit Agui 2 & 3
4.5. Stable water isotopes
5. Discussion
5.1. Environment and biogeography
5.1.1. Water isotopes
5.1.2. Biotic seasonality
5.2. Site and cave formation
5.2.1. Geomorphological and natural formation processes
5.2.2. Biogenic accumulations
5.3. Human interactions with caves
5.3.1. Prehistoric
5.3.2. Historic
5.3.3. Recent
6. Conclusions
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.quaint.2021.03.010
Other: shh2872
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Quaternary International
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Oxford : Pergamon
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 586 Sequence Number: 010 Start / End Page: 66 - 89 Identifier: ISSN: 1040-6182
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925588348