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  Task-Irrelevant Visual Forms Facilitate Covert and Overt Spatial Selection

Bogadhi, A., Buonocore, A., & Hafed, Z. (2020). Task-Irrelevant Visual Forms Facilitate Covert and Overt Spatial Selection. The Journal of Neuroscience, 40(49), 9496-9506. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1593-20.2020.

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Bogadhi, AR1, Author              
Buonocore, A, Author
Hafed, ZM, Author
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Covert and overt spatial selection behaviors are guided by both visual saliency maps derived from early visual features as well as priority maps reflecting high-level cognitive factors. However, whether mid-level perceptual processes associated with visual form recognition contribute to covert and overt spatial selection behaviors remains unclear. We hypothesized that if peripheral visual forms contribute to spatial selection behaviors, then they should do so even when the visual forms are task-irrelevant. We tested this hypothesis in male and female human subjects as well as in male macaque monkeys performing a visual detection task. In this task, subjects reported the detection of a suprathreshold target spot presented on top of one of two peripheral images, and they did so with either a speeded manual button press (humans) or a speeded saccadic eye movement response (humans and monkeys). Crucially, the two images, one with a visual form and the other with a partially phase-scrambled visual form, were completely irrelevant to the task. In both manual (covert) and oculomotor (overt) response modalities, and in both humans and monkeys, response times were faster when the target was congruent with a visual form than when it was incongruent. Importantly, incongruent targets were associated with almost all errors, suggesting that forms automatically captured selection behaviors. These findings demonstrate that mid-level perceptual processes associated with visual form recognition contribute to covert and overt spatial selection. This indicates that neural circuits associated with target selection, such as the superior colliculus, may have privileged access to visual form information.

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 Dates: 2020-12
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1593-20.2020
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Title: The Journal of Neuroscience
  Other : The Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : J. Neurosci.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Washington, DC : Society of Neuroscience
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 40 (49) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 9496 - 9506 Identifier: ISSN: 0270-6474
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925502187_1