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  Spatial attention deficits are causally linked to an area in macaque temporal cortex

Bogadhi, A., Bollimunta, A., Leopold, D., & Krauzlis, R. (2019). Spatial attention deficits are causally linked to an area in macaque temporal cortex. Current Biology, 29(5), 726-736. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2019.01.028.

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Bogadhi, AR1, Author              
Bollimunta, A, Author
Leopold, DA, Author              
Krauzlis, RJ, Author
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1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Spatial neglect is a common clinical syndrome involving disruption of the brain’s attention-related circuitry, including the dorsocaudal temporal cortex. In macaques, the attention deficits associated with neglect can be readily modeled, but the absence of evidence for temporal cortex involvement has suggested a fundamental difference from humans. To map the neurological expression of neglect-like attention deficits in macaques, we measured attention-related fMRI activity across the cerebral cortex during experimental induction of neglect through reversible inactivation of the superior colliculus and frontal eye fields. During inactivation, monkeys exhibited hallmark attentional deficits of neglect in tasks using either motion or non-motion stimuli. The behavioral deficits were accompanied by marked reductions in fMRI attentional modulation that were strongest in a small region on the floor of the superior temporal sulcus; smaller reductions were also found in frontal eye fields and dorsal parietal cortex. Notably, direct inactivation of the mid-superior temporal sulcus (STS) cortical region identified by fMRI caused similar neglect-like spatial attention deficits. These results identify a putative macaque homolog to temporal cortex structures known to play a central role in human neglect.

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 Dates: 2019-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2019.01.028
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Title: Current Biology
  Other : Curr. Biol.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Cell Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 29 (5) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 726 - 736 Identifier: ISSN: 0960-9822
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925579107