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  Sequential Bayes Factor designs in developmental research: Studies on early word learning

Mani, N., Schreiner, M. S., Brase, J., Köhler, K., Strassen, K., Postin, D., et al. (2021). Sequential Bayes Factor designs in developmental research: Studies on early word learning. Developmental Science, 24(4): e13097. doi:10.1111/desc.13097.

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 Creators:
Mani, Nivedita1, 2, Author
Schreiner, Melanie S.1, 2, 3, 4, Author           
Brase, Julia1, Author
Köhler, Katrin1, Author
Strassen, Katrin1, Author
Postin, Danilo1, Author
Schultze, Thomas2, 5, Author
Affiliations:
1Psychology of Language Department, Georg August University, Göttingen, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Leibniz-ScienceCampus Primate Cognition, Göttingen, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
5Department of Economic and Social Psychology, Georg August University, Göttingen, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Cross‐situational learning; Effective research; Informative research; Mispronunciation task; Mutual exclusivity; Sequential Bayes Factor
 Abstract: Developmental research, like many fields, is plagued by low sample sizes and inconclusive findings. The problem is amplified by the difficulties associated with recruiting infant participants for research as well as the increased variability in infant responses. With sequential testing designs providing a viable alternative to paradigms facing such issues, the current study implemented a Sequential Bayes Factor (SBF) design on three findings in the developmental literature. In particular, using the framework described by Schönbrödt and colleagues (2017), we examined infants’ sensitivity to mispronunciations of familiar words, their learning of novel word‐object associations from cross‐situational learning paradigms, and their assumption of mutual exclusivity in assigning novel labels to novel objects. We tested an initial sample of 20 participants in each study, incrementally increasing sample size by one and computing a Bayes Factor with each additional participant. In one study, we were able to obtain moderate evidence for the alternate hypotheses despite testing less than half the number of participants as in the original study. We did not replicate the findings of the cross‐situational learning study. Indeed, the data were five times more likely under the null hypothesis, allowing us to conclude that infants did not recognize the trained word‐object associations presented in the task. We discuss these findings in light of the advantages and disadvantages of using a SBF design in developmental research while also providing researchers with an account of how we implemented this design across multiple studies.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-01-072020-05-262021-01-222021-02-242021-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/desc.13097
Other: epub 2021
PMID: 33544976
 Degree: -

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Title: Developmental Science
  Other : Dev. Sci.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford, UK : Blackwell
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 24 (4) Sequence Number: e13097 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1363-755X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/963018343339