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  Hunting, herding, and people in the rock art of Mongolia: new discoveries in the Gobi-Altai Mountains

Vanwezer, N., Taylor, W. T. T., Bayarsaikhan, J., Breitenbach, S. F., Amano, N., Louys, J., et al. (2021). Hunting, herding, and people in the rock art of Mongolia: new discoveries in the Gobi-Altai Mountains. Archaeological Research in Asia, 26: 100267. doi:10.1016/j.ara.2021.100267.

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 Creators:
Vanwezer, Nils1, Author              
Taylor, William Timothy Treal1, Author              
Bayarsaikhan, Jamsranjav, Author
Breitenbach, Sebastian F.M., Author
Amano, Noel1, Author              
Louys, Julien, Author
del Val, Miren, Author
Boivin, Nicole1, Author              
Petraglia, Michael1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Petroglyphs, Ochre, Paleoclimate, Hunter-gatherer, Hunter-pastoralist, Preservation
 Abstract: Despite its harsh and arid conditions, the Gobi Desert has played an important role in shaping Holocene populations, including the transition from hunting to herding lifeways. Here we present three newly documented rock art sites in the Gobi-Altai Mountains of south-central Mongolia, a cave (Gazar Agui 1), a rock shelter (Gazar Agui 13) and an open-air landscape site overlooking a palaeolake (Unegt Uul). In addition, we re-examine the preservation of the rock art cave site of Saalit Agui some 20 years after its original documentation, using digital technology not available at that time. Comparisons of rock art at Gazar Agui 1 and Saalit Agui with previously documented rock art in Mongolia suggest links with Mesolithic and Neolithic anthropomorphic iconography. Unegt Uul and Gazar Agui 13 show Early Bronze Age to Iron Age symbols, suggesting two distinct periods of production, by hunter-gatherers during the Early Holocene and by later hunter-pastoralists during the Late Holocene. Our findings suggest that wet periods in mountainous basins of the Gobi-Altai were likely key to early human habitation, with pastoralism dominating during arid periods. Our observations further indicate that preservation of rock art sites in the region is currently under threat due to human activity and climate change.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-03-212021-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 15
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: 1. Introduction
1.1. Rock art
2. Geographical setting and identification of rock art sites
2.1. Gazar Agui 1
2.2. Gazar Agui 13
2.3. Saalit Agui
2.4. Unegt Uul
3. Rock art survey results
3.1. Gazar Agui 1
3.2. Gazar Agui 13
3.3. Saalit Agui
3.4. Unegt Uul
4. Discussion
4.1. Relative rock art chronology and comparisons
4.2. Environment and biogeography
4.3. Preservation
5. Conclusion
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.ara.2021.100267
Other: shh2879
 Degree: -

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Title: Archaeological Research in Asia
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 26 Sequence Number: 100267 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2352-2267
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2352-2267