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  Language dysfunction in schizophrenia: Assessing neural tracking to characterize the underlying disorder(s)?

Meyer, L., Lakatos, P., & He, Y. (2021). Language dysfunction in schizophrenia: Assessing neural tracking to characterize the underlying disorder(s)? Frontiers in Neuroscience, 15: 640502. doi:10.3389/fnins.2021.640502.

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 Creators:
Meyer, Lars1, 2, Author              
Lakatos, Peter3, Author
He, Yifei4, Author
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Language Cycles, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_3025666              
2Department of Phoniatrics and Pedaudiology, Münster University, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Center for Biomedical Imaging and Neuromodulation (C-BIN), Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, Orangeburg, NY, USA, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Philipps University Marburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Neural tracking; Neural oscillations; Schizophrenia; Electroencephalography; Language comprehension; Speech perception
 Abstract: Deficits in language production and comprehension are characteristic of schizophrenia. To date, it remains unclear whether these deficits arise from dysfunctional linguistic knowledge, or dysfunctional predictions derived from the linguistic context. Alternatively, the deficits could be a result of dysfunctional neural tracking of auditory information resulting in decreased auditory information fidelity and even distorted information. Here, we discuss possible ways for clinical neuroscientists to employ neural tracking methodology to independently characterize deficiencies on the auditory–sensory and abstract linguistic levels. This might lead to a mechanistic understanding of the deficits underlying language related disorder(s) in schizophrenia. We propose to combine naturalistic stimulation, measures of speech–brain synchronization, and computational modeling of abstract linguistic knowledge and predictions. These independent but likely interacting assessments may be exploited for an objective and differential diagnosis of schizophrenia, as well as a better understanding of the disorder on the functional level—illustrating the potential of neural tracking methodology as translational tool in a range of psychotic populations.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-12-112021-02-032021-02-22
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnins.2021.640502
Other: eCollection 2021
PMID: 33692672
PMC: PMC7937925
 Degree: -

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Project name : -
Grant ID : R01DC012947, R01MH109289, and P50MH109429
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Funding organization : National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Project name : -
Grant ID : HE8029/2-1
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)

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Title: Frontiers in Neuroscience
  Other : Front Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 15 Sequence Number: 640502 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1662-4548
ISSN: 1662-453X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1662-4548