English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Oil palm cultivation critically affects sociality in a threatened Malaysian primate

Holzner, A., Balasubramaniam, K. N., Weiß, B. M., Ruppert, N., & Widdig, A. (2021). Oil palm cultivation critically affects sociality in a threatened Malaysian primate. Scientific Reports, 11: 10353. doi:10.1038/s41598-021-89783-3.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Holzner_Oil_SciRep_2021.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
Name:
Holzner_Oil_SciRep_2021.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
2021
Copyright Info:
This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Holzner, Anna1, 2, 3, Author              
Balasubramaniam, Krishna N., Author
Weiß, Brigitte M.1, 2, Author              
Ruppert, Nadine, Author
Widdig, Anja1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Human Behavior Ecology and Culture, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, DE, ou_2173689              
2Research Group Primate Behavioural Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, ou_3166785              
3The Leipzig School of Human Origins (IMPRS), Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, DE, ou_1497688              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Human-induced habitat alterations globally threaten animal populations, often evoking complex behavioural responses in wildlife. This may be particularly dramatic when negatively affecting social behaviour, which fundamentally determines individual fitness and offspring survival in group-living animals. Here, we provide first evidence for significant behavioural modifications in sociality of southern pig-tailed macaques visiting Malaysian oil palm plantations in search of food despite elevated predation risk. Specifically, we found critical reductions of key positive social interactions but higher rates of aggression in the plantation interior compared to the plantation edge (i.e. plantation areas bordering the forest) and the forest. At the plantation edge, affiliation even increased compared to the forest, while central positions in the macaques' social network structure shifted from high-ranking adult females and immatures to low-ranking individuals. Further, plantations also affected mother-infant relationships, with macaque mothers being more protective in the open plantation environment. We suggest that although primates can temporarily persist in human-altered habitats, their ability to permanently adapt requires the presence of close-by forest and comes with a trade-off in sociality, potentially hampering individual fitness and infant survival. Studies like ours remain critical for understanding species’ adaptability to anthropogenic landscapes, which may ultimately contribute to facilitating their coexistence with humans and preserving biodiversity.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41598-021-89783-3
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Scientific Reports
  Abbreviation : Sci. Rep.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London, UK : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 11 Sequence Number: 10353 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2045-2322