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  The evolution and ecology of land ownership

Haynie, H., Kushnick, G., Kavanagh, P. H., Ember, C., Bowern, C., Low, B. S., et al. (2021). The evolution and ecology of land ownership. SocArXiv Papers, y5n6z. doi:10.31235/osf.io/y5n6z.

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 Creators:
Haynie, Hannah, Author
Kushnick, Geoff, Author
Kavanagh, Patrick H., Author
Ember, Carol, Author
Bowern, Claire, Author
Low, Bobbi S., Author
Tuff, Ty, Author
Vilela, Bruno, Author
Kirby, Kathryn1, Author              
Botero, Carlos A., Author
Gavin, Michael C.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Linguistic and Cultural Evolution, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074311              

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Free keywords: Social and Behavioral Sciences, Geography, Environmental Studies, Anthropology
 Abstract: Land ownership norms play a central role in social-ecological systems, and have been studied extensively as a component of ethnographies. Yet only recently has the distribution of land ownership norms across cultures been examined from evolutionary and ecological perspectives. Here we incorporate evolutionary and macroecological modelling to test associations between land ownership norms and environmental, subsistence, and cultural contact predictors for societies in the Bantu language family. We find that Bantu land ownership norms likely evolved on a unilinear trajectory, but not necessarily one requiring consistent increase in exclusivity as suggested by prior theory. Our macroecological analyses suggest that Bantu societies are more likely to have some form of ownership when their neighbors also do. We also find an effect of environmental productivity, supporting resource defensibility theory, which posits that land ownership is more likely where productivity is predictable. We find less support for a proposed link between agricultural intensification and land ownership. Overall, we demonstrate the value of combining analytical approaches from evolution and ecology to test diverse hypotheses on land ownership across a range of disciplines.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021-05-03
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 27
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: 1. Introduction
2. Materials and methods
2.1 Data
2.2 Phylogenetic analyses of evolution of land ownership
2.3 Multi-model inference of drivers of spatial patterns in land ownership
3. Results
3.1 Evolutionary trajectories of land ownership
3.2 Drivers of spatial variation in land ownership
4. Discussion
 Rev. Type: No review
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.31235/osf.io/y5n6z
 Degree: -

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Title: SocArXiv Papers
  Abbreviation : SocArXiv
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: y5n6z Start / End Page: - Identifier: URN: https://osf.io/preprints/socarxiv/