English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Reconstitution of contractile actomyosin rings in vesicles

Litschel, T., Kelley, C. F., Holz, D., Koudehi, M. A., Vogel, S. K., Burbaum, L., et al. (2021). Reconstitution of contractile actomyosin rings in vesicles. Nature Communications, 12(1): 2254. doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22422-7.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show
hide
Description:
Open Access

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Litschel, Thomas1, Author              
Kelley, Charlotte F.1, Author              
Holz, Danielle2, Author
Koudehi, Maral Adeli2, Author
Vogel, Sven Kenjiro1, Author
Burbaum, Laura1, Author              
Mizuno, Naoko3, Author              
Vavylonis, Dimitrios2, Author
Schwille, Petra1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Schwille, Petra / Cellular and Molecular Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1565169              
2external, ou_persistent22              
3Conti, Elena / Structural Cell Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1565144              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: ACTIN-FILAMENT; IN-VITRO; PERSISTENCE LENGTH; CORTICAL TENSION; LIPOSOMES; NETWORKS; DYNAMICS; ORGANIZATION; CYTOSKELETON; MECHANISMScience & Technology - Other Topics;
 Abstract: One of the grand challenges of bottom-up synthetic biology is the development of minimal machineries for cell division. The mechanical transformation of large-scale compartments, such as Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs), requires the geometry-specific coordination of active elements, several orders of magnitude larger than the molecular scale. Of all cytoskeletal structures, large-scale actomyosin rings appear to be the most promising cellular elements to accomplish this task. Here, we have adopted advanced encapsulation methods to study bundled actin filaments in GUVs and compare our results with theoretical modeling. By changing few key parameters, actin polymerization can be differentiated to resemble various types of networks in living cells. Importantly, we find membrane binding to be crucial for the robust condensation into a single actin ring in spherical vesicles, as predicted by theoretical considerations. Upon force generation by ATP-driven myosin motors, these ring-like actin structures contract and locally constrict the vesicle, forming furrow-like deformations. On the other hand, cortex-like actin networks are shown to induce and stabilize deformations from spherical shapes. Cytoskeletal networks support and direct cell shape and guide intercellular transport, but relatively little is understood about the self-organization of cytoskeletal components on the scale of an entire cell. Here, authors use an in vitro system and observe the assembly of different types of actin networks and the condensation of membrane-bound actin into single rings.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2021
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 10
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Nature Communications
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: HEIDELBERGER PLATZ 3, BERLIN, 14197, GERMANY : NATURE RESEARCH
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 12 (1) Sequence Number: 2254 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2041-1723